IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/socmed/v75y2012i9p1673-1684.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Heavy agricultural workloads and low crop diversity are strong barriers to improving child feeding practices in the Bolivian Andes

Author

Listed:
  • Jones, Andrew D.
  • Cruz Agudo, Yesmina
  • Galway, Lindsay
  • Bentley, Jeffery
  • Pinstrup-Andersen, Per

Abstract

Most nutrition initiatives to date aimed at improving infant and young child feeding (IYCF) have emphasized addressing knowledge gaps through behavior change messaging with less focus on addressing the underlying environmental barriers that may shape these behaviors. This research integrates an analysis of longitudinal dietary data with qualitative data on barriers to improved child feeding to identify the nature and extent of the barriers caregivers face to improving IYCF practices in a farming region of the Bolivian Andes, and to determine the relative influence of these barriers on caregivers' abilities to improve IYCF practices. Sixty-nine caregivers were selected from a sample of 331 households that participated in a longitudinal survey assessing changes in IYCF practices among caregivers with children aged 0–36 months from March 2009 to March 2010. Forty-nine barriers within 12 categories of barriers were identified through semi-structured interviews with the 69 caregivers. The most frequently reported barriers were those related to women's time dedicated to agricultural labor, the limited diversity of household agricultural production, and lack of support for child feeding from spouses and mothers-in-law. In multivariate analyses controlling for several variables that could potentially influence IYCF practices, these barriers were negatively associated with changes to the diversity of child diets, child dietary energy intake, and child meal frequency. While knowledge gaps and individual-level influences affected IYCF practices, physical and social caregiving environments in this region of Bolivia were even more important. Behavior change communication alone will likely not address the social and environmental barriers to improved child feeding that often prevent translation of improved knowledge into action. Particularly in rural regions, agriculture may strongly influence child feeding, not only indirectly through household food security, but also directly by affecting women's caregiving capacity.

Suggested Citation

  • Jones, Andrew D. & Cruz Agudo, Yesmina & Galway, Lindsay & Bentley, Jeffery & Pinstrup-Andersen, Per, 2012. "Heavy agricultural workloads and low crop diversity are strong barriers to improving child feeding practices in the Bolivian Andes," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(9), pages 1673-1684.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:75:y:2012:i:9:p:1673-1684
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2012.06.025
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277953612005333
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.1016/j.socscimed.2012.06.025?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Merzel, C. & D'Afflitti, J., 2003. "Reconsidering community-based health promotion: Promise, performance, and potential," American Journal of Public Health, American Public Health Association, vol. 93(4), pages 557-574.
    2. Arimond, Mary & Ruel, Marie T., 2002. "Progress in developing an infant and child feeding index," FCND discussion papers 143, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Aubel, Judi & Touré, Ibrahima & Diagne, Mamadou, 2004. "Senegalese grandmothers promote improved maternal and child nutrition practices: the guardians of tradition are not averse to change," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 59(5), pages 945-959, September.
    4. Briscoe, Ciara & Aboud, Frances, 2012. "Behaviour change communication targeting four health behaviours in developing countries: A review of change techniques," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(4), pages 612-621.
    5. Hermstad, April K. & Swan, Deanne W. & Kegler, Michelle C. & Barnette, J.K. & Glanz, Karen, 2010. "Individual and environmental correlates of dietary fat intake in rural communities: A structural equation model analysis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 71(1), pages 93-101, July.
    6. Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Pandolfelli, Lauren, 2010. "Promising Approaches to Address the Needs of Poor Female Farmers: Resources, Constraints, and Interventions," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 581-592, April.
    7. Mabiso, Athur & Maystadt, Jean-François & Vandercasteelen, Joachim & Hirvonen, Kalle, 2014. "Enhancing resilience for food security in refugee-hosting communities:," 2020 conference briefs 2, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Engle, Patrice L. & Menon, Purnima & Haddad, Lawrence, 1999. "Care and Nutrition: Concepts and Measurement," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(8), pages 1309-1337, August.
    9. Bezner Kerr, Rachel & Dakishoni, Laifolo & Shumba, Lizzie & Msachi, Rodgers & Chirwa, Marko, 2008. ""We Grandmothers Know Plenty": Breastfeeding, complementary feeding and the multifaceted role of grandmothers in Malawi," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 66(5), pages 1095-1105, March.
    10. Kaufman, Leslie & Karpati, Adam, 2007. "Understanding the sociocultural roots of childhood obesity: Food practices among Latino families of Bushwick, Brooklyn," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 64(11), pages 2177-2188, June.
    11. Stanton, Bonita & Black, Robert & Engle, Patrice & Pelto, Gretel, 1992. "Theory-driven behavioral intervention research for the control of diarrheal diseases," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 35(11), pages 1405-1420, December.
    12. Ukwuani, Festus A. & Suchindran, Chirayath M., 2003. "Implications of women's work for child nutritional status in sub-Saharan Africa: a case study of Nigeria," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 56(10), pages 2109-2121, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Kim, Jongwoo & Mason, Nicole M. & Snapp ,Sieglinde, 2017. "Does Sustainable Intensification of Maize Production Enhance Child Nutrition? Evidence from Rural Tanzania," Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security Policy Research Papers 265406, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security (FSP).
    2. Olivia Nankinga & Betty Kwagala & Eddy J Walakira, 2019. "Maternal employment and child nutritional status in Uganda," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 14(12), pages 1-14, December.
    3. Kim, Jongwoo & Mason, Nicole M. & Snapp, Sieglinde S., 2018. "Does sustainable intensification of maize production enhance child nutrition? Evidence from rural Tanzania," 2018 Annual Meeting, August 5-7, Washington, D.C. 273906, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    4. Dury, S. & Alpha, A. & Bichard, A., 2014. "What risks do agricultural interventions entail for nutrition?," Working Papers MoISA 201403, UMR MoISA : Montpellier Interdisciplinary center on Sustainable Agri-food systems (social and nutritional sciences): CIHEAM-IAMM, CIRAD, INRAE, L'Institut Agro, Montpellier SupAgro, IRD - Montpellier, France.
    5. Mutiso, Janet Mwende, 2017. "Assessment Of Factors Influencing Women’S Behaviour Towards Maternal, Infant And Young Child Feeding In Homa Bay County, Kenya," Research Theses 276441, Collaborative Masters Program in Agricultural and Applied Economics.
    6. Joe Yates & Swetha Manohar & Shiva Bhandari & Zachary Gersten & Sofia Kalamatianou & Arvin Saleh, 2018. "Building bridges and deconstructing pathways in agriculture, nutrition and health," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 10(3), pages 689-700, June.
    7. Ruel, Marie T. & Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Balagamwala, Mysbah, 2017. "Nutrition-sensitive agriculture: What have we learned and where do we go from here?:," IFPRI discussion papers 1681, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Mysbah Balagamwala & Haris Gazdar & Hussain Bux Mallah, 2015. "Synergy or Trade-Off between Agricultural Growth and Nutrition Women’s Work and Care," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 54(4), pages 897-913.
    9. Jones, Andrew D. & Shrinivas, Aditya & Bezner-Kerr, Rachel, 2014. "Farm production diversity is associated with greater household dietary diversity in Malawi: Findings from nationally representative data," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 1-12.
    10. Steven J. Vanek & Andrew D. Jones & Laurie E. Drinkwater, 2016. "Coupling of soil regeneration, food security, and nutrition outcomes in Andean subsistence agroecosystems," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 8(4), pages 727-742, August.
    11. Peter R. Berti & Heber Araujo Cossio, 2017. "Raising chickens for increased egg consumption in a rural highland Bolivian population," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 9(6), pages 1329-1341, December.
    12. Sara Stevano & Suneetha Kadiyala & Deborah Johnston & Hazel Malapit & Elizabeth Hull & Sofia Kalamatianou, 2019. "Time-Use Analytics: An Improved Way of Understanding Gendered Agriculture-Nutrition Pathways," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(3), pages 1-22, July.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Bezner Kerr, Rachel & Dakishoni, Laifolo & Shumba, Lizzie & Msachi, Rodgers & Chirwa, Marko, 2008. ""We Grandmothers Know Plenty": Breastfeeding, complementary feeding and the multifaceted role of grandmothers in Malawi," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 66(5), pages 1095-1105, March.
    2. Adelman, Sarah, 2013. "Keep your friends close: The effect of local social networks on child human capital outcomes," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 284-298.
    3. Smith, Lisa C. & Ruel, Marie T. & Ndiaye, Aida, 2004. "Why is child malnutrition lower in urban than rural areas?," FCND discussion papers 176, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Jerico Franciscus Pardosi & Nick Parr & Salut Muhidin, 2017. "Fathers and infant health and survival in Ende, a rural district of Eastern Indonesia," Journal of Population Research, Springer, vol. 34(2), pages 185-207, June.
    5. Malapit, Hazel Jean L. & Kadiyala, Suneetha & Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Cunningham, Kenda & Tyagi, Parul, 2013. "Women’s empowerment in agriculture, production diversity, and nutrition: Evidence from Nepal:," IFPRI discussion papers 1313, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Fouts, Hillary N. & Brookshire, Robyn A., 2009. "Who feeds children? A child's-eye-view of caregiver feeding patterns among the Aka foragers in Congo," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 285-292, July.
    7. Joshua Sikhu Okonya & Netsayi Noris Mudege & Anne M. Rietveld & Anastase Nduwayezu & Déo Kantungeko & Bernadette Marie Hakizimana & John Njuki Nyaga & Guy Blomme & James Peter Legg & Jürgen Kroschel, 2019. "The Role of Women in Production and Management of RTB Crops in Rwanda and Burundi: Do Men Decide, and Women Work?," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(16), pages 1-15, August.
    8. Langford, Rebecca & Panter-Brick, Catherine, 2013. "A health equity critique of social marketing: Where interventions have impact but insufficient reach," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 133-141.
    9. Hannah Gichungi & Beatrice Muriithi & Patrick Irungu & Gracious Diiro & John Busienei, 2021. "Effect of Technological Innovation on Gender Roles: The Case of Fruit Fly IPM Adoption on Women’s Decision-Making in Mango Production and Marketing in Kenya," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 33(3), pages 407-426, June.
    10. Alwang, Jeffrey & Larochelle, Catherine & Barrera, Victor, 2017. "Farm Decision Making and Gender: Results from a Randomized Experiment in Ecuador," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 117-129.
    11. Thomas Vendryes, 2014. "Peasants Against Private Property Rights: A Review Of The Literature," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(5), pages 971-995, December.
    12. Lone Badstue & Patti Petesch & Cathy Rozel Farnworth & Lara Roeven & Mahlet Hailemariam, 2020. "Women Farmers and Agricultural Innovation: Marital Status and Normative Expectations in Rural Ethiopia," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(23), pages 1-22, November.
    13. Smith, Lisa C., 1998. "Can FAO's measure of chronic undernourishment be strengthened?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 425-445, October.
    14. Alobo Loison, Sarah & Hillbom, Ellen, 2020. "Regional evidence of smallholder-based growth in Zambia’s livestock sector," World Development Perspectives, Elsevier, vol. 19(C).
    15. Haddad, Lawrence & Bhattarai, Saroj & Immink, Maarten & Kumar, Shubh, 1998. "Estimating the interactions between household food security and preschool diarrhea," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 23(3-4), pages 241-261, November.
    16. Smith, Lisa C. & Haddad, Lawrence James, 1999. "Explaining child malnutrition in developing countries," FCND discussion papers 60, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    17. Fisher, Monica & Kandiwa, Vongai, 2014. "Can agricultural input subsidies reduce the gender gap in modern maize adoption? Evidence from Malawi," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 101-111.
    18. Lentz, Erin C. & Narayanan, Sudha & De, Anuradha, 2019. "Last and least: Findings on intrahousehold undernutrition from participatory research in South Asia," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 232(C), pages 316-323.
    19. Pakrashi, Debayan & Saha, Sarani, 2020. "Intergenerational consequences of maternal domestic violence: Effect on nutritional status of children," GLO Discussion Paper Series 551, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    20. Maxwell, Daniel & Levin, Carol & Csete, Joanne, 1998. "Does urban agriculture help prevent malnutrition? Evidence from Kampala," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 411-424, October.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:75:y:2012:i:9:p:1673-1684. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/315/description#description .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Catherine Liu (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/315/description#description .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.