IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/wbk/wbrwps/7111.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Does livestock ownership affect animal source foods consumption and child nutritional status ? evidence from rural Uganda

Author

Listed:
  • Azzarri, Carlo
  • Cross, Elizabeth
  • Haile, Beliyou
  • Zezza, Alberto

Abstract

In many developing countries, consumption of animal source foods among the poor is still at a level where increasing its share in total caloric intake may have many positive nutritional benefits. This paper explores whether ownership of various livestock species increases consumption of animal source foods and helps improve child nutritional status. The paper finds some evidence that food consumption patterns and nutritional outcomes may be affected by livestock ownership in rural Uganda. The results are suggestive that promoting (small) livestock ownership has the potential to affect human nutrition in rural Uganda, but further research is needed to estimate more precisely the direction and size of these effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Azzarri, Carlo & Cross, Elizabeth & Haile, Beliyou & Zezza, Alberto, 2014. "Does livestock ownership affect animal source foods consumption and child nutritional status ? evidence from rural Uganda," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7111, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:7111
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www-wds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2014/11/14/000158349_20141114085241/Rendered/PDF/WPS7111.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. E. Miller, Jane & V. Rodgers, Yana, 2009. "Mother’s Education and Children’s Nutritional Status: New Evidence from Cambodia," Asian Development Review, Asian Development Bank, vol. 26(1), pages 131-165.
    2. Senauer, Benjamin, 1990. "Household behaviour and nutrition in developing countries," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 15(5), pages 408-417, October.
    3. Oriana Bandiera & Robin Burgess & Narayan Das & Selim Gulesci & Imran Rasul & Munshi Sulaiman, 2013. "Can Basic Entrepreneurship Transform the Economic Lives of the Poor?," STICERD - Economic Organisation and Public Policy Discussion Papers Series 043, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.
    4. Jeffrey M Wooldridge, 2010. "Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 2, volume 1, number 0262232588, August.
    5. Sahn, David E. & Alderman, Harold, 1997. "On the determinants of nutrition in Mozambique: The importance of age-specific effects," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 577-588, January.
    6. Jin, Minchao & Iannotti, Lora L., 2014. "Livestock production, animal source food intake, and young child growth: The role of gender for ensuring nutrition impacts," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 16-21.
    7. Garrett, James L. & Ruel, Marie T., 1999. "Are Determinants of Rural and Urban Food Security and Nutritional Status Different? Some Insights from Mozambique," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(11), pages 1955-1975, November.
    8. J. Taylor & Irma Adelman, 2003. "Agricultural Household Models: Genesis, Evolution, and Extensions," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 33-58, January.
    9. Argent, Jonathan & Augsburg, Britta & Rasul, Imran, 2014. "Livestock asset transfers with and without training: Evidence from Rwanda," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 19-39.
    10. Jane Kabubo-Mariara & Godfrey K. Ndenge & Domisiano K. Mwabu, 2009. "Determinants of Children's Nutritional Status in Kenya: Evidence from Demographic and Health Surveys," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 18(3), pages 363-387, June.
    11. Bardhan, Pranab & Udry, Christopher, 1999. "Development Microeconomics," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198773719.
    12. Fischer, Tim, 2003. "The Livestock Revolution: A Pathway from Poverty?," 2003: The Livestock Revolution: A Pathway from Poverty?, 13 August 2003 124003, Crawford Fund.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Del Prete, Davide & Ghins, Léopold & Magrini, Emiliano & Pauw, Karl, 2019. "Land consolidation, specialization and household diets: Evidence from Rwanda," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 139-149.
    2. Schneider, K. & Masters, W.A., 2018. "Orange Fanta vs orange fruit: A novel measure of nutrition knowledge and women’s diet quality in Malawi," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 275959, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. Johanna T. Wong & Brigitte Bagnol & Heather Grieve & Joanita Bendita Jong & Mu Li & Robyn G. Alders, 2018. "Factors influencing animal-source food consumption in Timor-Leste," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 10(3), pages 741-762, June.
    4. Katharina Lehmann-Uschner & Kati Kraehnert, 2017. "Food Intake and the Role of Food Self-Provisioning," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(8), pages 1303-1322, August.
    5. Alessandro Romeo & Janice Meerman & Mulat Demeke & Antonio Scognamillo & Solomon Asfaw, 2016. "Linking farm diversification to household diet diversification: evidence from a sample of Kenyan ultra-poor farmers," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 8(6), pages 1069-1085, December.
    6. Sakaue, Katsuki, 2018. "Informal fee charge and school choice under a free primary education policy: Panel data evidence from rural Uganda," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 112-127.
    7. Raghav Gaiha & Shantanu Mathur, 2018. "Agricultural research, technology and nutrition in Sub-Saharan Africa," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 292018, GDI, The University of Manchester.
    8. Rosenberg, Adam M. & Maluccio, John A. & Harris, Jody & Mwanamwenge, Marjolein & Nguyen, Phuong H. & Tembo, Gelson & Rawat, Rahul, 2018. "Nutrition-sensitive agricultural interventions, agricultural diversity, food access and child dietary diversity: Evidence from rural Zambia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 10-23.
    9. Joe Yates & Swetha Manohar & Shiva Bhandari & Zachary Gersten & Sofia Kalamatianou & Arvin Saleh, 2018. "Building bridges and deconstructing pathways in agriculture, nutrition and health," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 10(3), pages 689-700, June.
    10. Tiberti, M. & Zezza, A. & Azzarri, C., 2018. "Livestock Ownership and Child Nutrition in Uganda: Evidence from a Panel Survey," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 277403, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    11. Sékou Amadou Traoré & Christoph Reiber & Bekele Megersa & Anne Valle Zárate, 2018. "Contribution of cattle of different breeds to household food security in southern Mali," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 10(3), pages 549-560, June.
    12. Choudhury, Samira & Headey, Derek D., 2018. "Household dairy production and child growth: Evidence from Bangladesh," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 150-161.
    13. Bageant, Elizabeth & Liu, Yanyan & Diao, Xinshen, 2016. "Agriculture-nutrition linkages and child health in the presence of conflict in Nepal:," IFPRI discussion papers 1515, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    14. Peter R. Berti & Heber Araujo Cossio, 2017. "Raising chickens for increased egg consumption in a rural highland Bolivian population," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 9(6), pages 1329-1341, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Livestock and Animal Husbandry; Regional Economic Development; Rural Poverty Reduction; Wildlife Resources; Economic Theory&Research;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:7111. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Roula I. Yazigi). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/dvewbus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.