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Livestock asset transfers with and without training: evidence from Rwanda

Author

Listed:
  • Jonathan Argent

    (Institute for Fiscal Studies)

  • Britta Augsburg

    () (Institute for Fiscal Studies and Institute for Fiscal Studies)

  • Imran Rasul

    () (Institute for Fiscal Studies and University College London and IFS)

Abstract

This paper presents evidence from Rwanda's Girinka ('One Cow per Poor Family') program that has distributed more than 130,000 livestock asset transfers in the form of cows to the rural poor since 2006. Supply side constraints on the programe results in some beneficiaries receiving complementary training with the cow transfer, and other households not receiving such training with their cow. We exploit these constraints to estimate the additional impact of receiving complementary training with the cow transfer, on household's economic outcomes up to six years after having receieved the livestock asset transfer. Our results show that even in a setting such as rural Rwanda where linkages between farmers and produce markets remain weak, the provision of training with asset transfers has permanent and economically significant impacts on milk production, milk yields from livestock, household earnings, and asset accumulation. The results have important implications for the current generation of 'ultra-poor' livestock asset transfer programes being trialled globally as a means to allow the rural poor to better their economic lives.

Suggested Citation

  • Jonathan Argent & Britta Augsburg & Imran Rasul, 2013. "Livestock asset transfers with and without training: evidence from Rwanda," IFS Working Papers W13/23, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:ifs:ifsewp:13/23
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Olivia Bertelli, 2020. "Investing in Agriculture when it is worth it. Empirical evidence from rural Uganda," Working Papers hal-02446820, HAL.
    2. Kazushi Takahashi & Abu Shonchoy & Seiro Ito & Takashi Kurosaki, 2017. "How Does Contract Design Affect the Uptake of Microcredit among the Ultra-poor? Experimental Evidence from the River Islands of Northern Bangladesh," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(4), pages 530-547, April.
    3. Olivia Bertelli, 2019. "Investing in agriculture when it is worth it. Evidence from rural Uganda," Working Papers DT/2019/05, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
    4. Nilsson, Pia & Backman, Mikaela & Bjerke, Lina & Maniriho, Aristide, 2019. "One cow per poor family: Effects on the growth of consumption and crop production," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 1-12.
    5. Enock Warinda & Dickson M Nyariki & Stephen Wambua & Reuben M Muasya & Munir A Hanjra, 2020. "Sustainable development in East Africa: impact evaluation of regional agricultural development projects in Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda," Natural Resources Forum, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 44(1), pages 3-39, February.
    6. Nilsson, Pia & Backman, Mikaela & Bjerke, Lina & Maniriho, Aristide, 2017. "One cow per poor family: effects on consumption and crop production in Rwanda," Working Paper Series in Economics and Institutions of Innovation 462, Royal Institute of Technology, CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies.
    7. Christopher Ksoll & Chantal Toledo & Seth Morgan & Anca Dumitrescu & Kristen Velyvis, "undated". "Evaluation of the Burkina Faso Agriculture Development Project: Design Report," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 1eb478039edc4b0eaaa6144ba, Mathematica Policy Research.
    8. Carlo Azzarri & Alberto Zezza & Beliyou Haile & Elizabeth Cross, 2015. "Does Livestock Ownership Affect Animal Source Foods Consumption and Child Nutritional Status? Evidence from Rural Uganda," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(8), pages 1034-1059, August.
    9. Seré, Carlos, 2020. "Investing Sustainably in African Livestock Development: Opportunities and Trade-Offs," Working Papers 305186, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).
    10. Tadesse, Getaw & Zewdie, Tadiwos, 2019. "Grants vs. credits for improving the livelihoods of ultra-poor: Evidence from Ethiopia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 320-329.
    11. Edmonds, Eric & Theoharides, Caroline, 2020. "The short term impact of a productive asset transfer in families with child labor: Experimental evidence from the Philippines," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 146(C).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Livestock Asset Transfer; Training; Ultra-poor;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets

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