IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/eca/wpaper/2013-275068.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Informational shocks and street-food safety: A field study in urban India

Author

Listed:
  • Giammarco Daniele
  • Sulagna Mookerjee
  • Denni Tommasi

Abstract

Street-food safety is a public health concern in several developing countries. We investigate whether improvements in food safety can be achieved by providing information to vendors in the form of a training. Among randomly assigned groups of street-food vendors in urban Kolkata, India, we find large improvements in knowledge and awareness, but little changes in their observed behaviors. We provide suggestive evidence that a combination of both lack of demand for food safety and perceived high costs of hygiene practices for vendors, are likely to drive the results. We conclude that information is not the key constraint in this context

Suggested Citation

  • Giammarco Daniele & Sulagna Mookerjee & Denni Tommasi, 2018. "Informational shocks and street-food safety: A field study in urban India," Working Papers ECARES 2018-20, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  • Handle: RePEc:eca:wpaper:2013/275068
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://dipot.ulb.ac.be/dspace/bitstream/2013/275068/3/2018-20-DANIELE_MOOKERJEE_TOMMASI-informational.pdf
    File Function: Œuvre complète ou partie de l'œuvre
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Abhijit Banerjee & Sharon Barnhardt & Esther Duflo, 2015. "Movies, Margins, and Marketing: Encouraging the Adoption of Iron-Fortified Salt," NBER Chapters,in: Insights in the Economics of Aging, pages 285-306 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Lyon,Thomas P. & Maxwell,John W., 2004. "Corporate Environmentalism and Public Policy," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521819473, June.
    3. Dean Karlan & Martin Valdivia, 2011. "Teaching Entrepreneurship: Impact of Business Training on Microfinance Clients and Institutions," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(2), pages 510-527, May.
    4. Valdivia, Martín, 2015. "Business training plus for female entrepreneurship? Short and medium-term experimental evidence from Peru," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 33-51.
    5. Maxwell, John W & Lyon, Thomas P & Hackett, Steven C, 2000. "Self-Regulation and Social Welfare: The Political Economy of Corporate Environmentalism," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 43(2), pages 583-617, October.
    6. Meredith, Jennifer & Robinson, Jonathan & Walker, Sarah & Wydick, Bruce, 2013. "Keeping the doctor away: Experimental evidence on investment in preventative health products," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 196-210.
    7. Mano, Yukichi & Iddrisu, Alhassan & Yoshino, Yutaka & Sonobe, Tetsushi, 2012. "How Can Micro and Small Enterprises in Sub-Saharan Africa Become More Productive? The Impacts of Experimental Basic Managerial Training," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 458-468.
    8. David P. Baron, 2009. "A Positive Theory of Moral Management, Social Pressure, and Corporate Social Performance," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(1), pages 7-43, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Food Safety; Public Health; Street-Food; Hawkers; Trainings; RCT; Informal Sector;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eca:wpaper:2013/275068. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Benoit Pauwels). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/arulbbe.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.