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Got milk? The impact of Heifer International’s livestock donation programs in Rwanda on nutritional outcomes

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  • Rawlins, Rosemary
  • Pimkina, Svetlana
  • Barrett, Christopher B.
  • Pedersen, Sarah
  • Wydick, Bruce

Abstract

International animal donation programs have become an increasingly popular way for people living in developed countries to transfer resources to families living in developing countries. We evaluate the impact of Heifer International’s dairy cow and meat goat donation programs in Rwanda. We find that the program substantially increases dairy and meat consumption among Rwandan households who were given a dairy cow or a meat goat, respectively. We also find marginally statistically significant increases in weight-for-height z-scores and weight-for-age z-scores of about 0.4 standard deviations among children aged 0–5years in households that were recipients of meat goats, and increases in height-for-age z-scores of about 0.5 standard deviations among children in households that received dairy cows. Our results suggest that increasing livestock ownership in developing countries may significantly increase consumption of nutrient dense animal-source foods and improve nutrition outcomes.

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  • Rawlins, Rosemary & Pimkina, Svetlana & Barrett, Christopher B. & Pedersen, Sarah & Wydick, Bruce, 2014. "Got milk? The impact of Heifer International’s livestock donation programs in Rwanda on nutritional outcomes," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 202-213.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:44:y:2014:i:c:p:202-213 DOI: 10.1016/j.foodpol.2013.12.003
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    1. Headey, Derek D. & Hoddinott, John F., 2015. "Agriculture, nutrition, and the Green Revolution in Bangladesh:," IFPRI discussion papers 1423, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Zezza, Alberto & Federighi, Giovanni & Adamou, Kalilou & Hiernaux, Pierre, 2014. "Milking the data : measuring income from milk production in extensive livestock systems -- experimental evidence from Niger," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7114, The World Bank.
    3. repec:oup:wbecrv:v:31:y:2017:i:2:p:434-458. is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Bruce Wydick & Paul Glewwe & Laine Rutledge, 2017. "Does Child Sponsorship Pay off in Adulthood? An International Study of Impacts on Income and Wealth," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 31(2), pages 434-458.
    5. Maestre, Mar & Poole, Nigel & Henson, Spencer, 2017. "Assessing food value chain pathways, linkages and impacts for better nutrition of vulnerable groups," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 31-39.
    6. Kafle, Kashi & Winter-Nelson, Alex & Goldsmith, Peter, 2016. "Does 25 cents more per day make a difference? The impact of livestock transfer and development in rural Zambia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 62-72.
    7. Jodlowski, Margaret & Winter-Nelson, Alex & Baylis, Kathy & Goldsmith, Peter D., 2016. "Milk in the Data: Food Security Impacts from a Livestock Field Experiment in Zambia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 99-114.
    8. John Hoddinott & Derek Headey & Mekdim Dereje, 2015. "Cows, Missing Milk Markets, and Nutrition in Rural Ethiopia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 958-975.
    9. Kabunga, Nassul, 2014. "Adoption and Impact of Improved Cow Breeds on Household Welfare and Child Nutrition Outcomes: Empirical Evidence from Uganda," 88th Annual Conference, April 9-11, 2014, AgroParisTech, Paris, France 170517, Agricultural Economics Society.
    10. Alessandro Romeo & Janice Meerman & Mulat Demeke & Antonio Scognamillo & Solomon Asfaw, 2016. "Linking farm diversification to household diet diversification: evidence from a sample of Kenyan ultra-poor farmers," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 8(6), pages 1069-1085, December.
    11. Darrouzet-Nardi, Amelia F. & Miller, Laurie C. & Joshi, Neena & Mahato, Shubh & Lohani, Mahendra & Rogers, Beatrice L., 2016. "Child dietary quality in rural Nepal: Effectiveness of a community-level development intervention," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 185-197.
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    13. Nilsson, Pia & Backman, Mikaela & Bjerke, Lina & Maniriho, Aristide, 2017. "One cow per poor family: effects on consumption and crop production in Rwanda," Working Paper Series in Economics and Institutions of Innovation 462, Royal Institute of Technology, CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies.
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    15. Domènech, Laia, 2015. "Is reliable water access the solution to undernutrition? A review of the potential of irrigation to solve nutrition and gender gaps in Africa South of the Sahara:," IFPRI discussion papers 1428, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    16. Larsen, Anna Folke & Lilleør, Helene Bie, 2014. "Beyond the Field: The Impact of Farmer Field Schools on Food Security and Poverty Alleviation," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 843-859.
    17. Darrouzet-Nardi, Amelia & Miller, Laurie & Joshi, Neena & Mahato, Shubh & Lohani, Mahendra & Drozdowsky, Julia & Beatrice, Rogers, 2016. "Longitudinal analysis of the intrahousehold distribution of foods in rural Nepal: Effectiveness of a community-level development intervention," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235536, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
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