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Impact of Income on Nutrient Intakes: Implications for Undernourishment and Obesity

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  • Matthew J. Salois
  • Richard Tiffin
  • Kelvin G. Balcombe

Abstract

The relationship between income and nutrient intake is explored. Nonparametric, panel, and quantile regressions are used. Engle curves for calories, fat, and protein are approximately linear in logs with carbohydrate intakes exhibiting diminishing elasticities as incomes increase. Elasticities range from 0.10 to 0.25, with fat having the highest elasticities. Countries in higher quantiles have lower elasticities than those in lower quantiles. Results predict significant cumulative increases in calorie consumption which are increasingly composed of fats. Though policies aimed at poverty alleviation and economic growth may assuage hunger and malnutrition, they may also exacerbate problems associated with obesity.

Suggested Citation

  • Matthew J. Salois & Richard Tiffin & Kelvin G. Balcombe, 2012. "Impact of Income on Nutrient Intakes: Implications for Undernourishment and Obesity," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(12), pages 1716-1730, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:48:y:2012:i:12:p:1716-1730
    DOI: 10.1080/00220388.2012.658376
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    Cited by:

    1. Ogundari, Kolawole & Aromolaran, Adebayo, 2016. "On the causal relationship between nutrition and economic Growth: Evidence from sub-Saharan Africa," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235352, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    2. Melo, P. C. & Abdul-Salam, Yakubu & Roberts, D. & Colen, L. & Mary, S. & Gomez Y Paloma, S., 2016. "Income growth and malnutrition in Africa: Is there a need for region-specific policies?," 90th Annual Conference, April 4-6, 2016, Warwick University, Coventry, UK 236372, Agricultural Economics Society.
    3. Patricia C Melo & Yakubu Abdul-Salam & Deborah Roberts & Alana Gilbert & Robin Matthews & Liesbeth Colen & Sergio Gomez Y Paloma, 2015. "Income Elasticities of Food Demand in Africa: A Meta-Analysis," JRC Working Papers JRC98812, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    4. Ogundari, Kolawole & Abdulai, Awudu, 2013. "Examining the heterogeneity in calorie–income elasticities: A meta-analysis," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 119-128.
    5. Kolawole Ogundari & Shoichi Ito & Victor O Okoruwa, 2016. "Estimating nutrition-income elasticities in sub-Saharan Africa: implications on health," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 43(1), pages 59-69, January.
    6. De Zhou & Xiaohua Yu, 2015. "Calorie Elasticities with Income Dynamics: Evidence from the Literature," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 37(4), pages 575-601.
    7. repec:eee:jfpoli:v:77:y:2018:i:c:p:116-132 is not listed on IDEAS

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