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On the causal relationship between nutrition and economic Growth: Evidence from sub-Saharan Africa

Listed author(s):
  • Ogundari, Kolawole
  • Aromolaran, Adebayo

The study investigates the causal relationship between nutrition and economic growth in sub Saharan Africa (SSA). A dynamic panel causality test based on the Blundell-Bond’s system generalized methods-of-moment (GMM) employed. To make efficient inference for the estimates, we check for the panel unit root and cointegration relationship amongst the variables. The variables were found to be non-stationary at level, stationary after first difference and co-integrated. The results of the causality tests reveal evidence of long and short-run bi-directional causality between nutrition and economic growth; which implies that nutritional improvement is a cause and consequence of economic growth and vice versa.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/235352
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Paper provided by Agricultural and Applied Economics Association in its series 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts with number 235352.

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Date of creation: 01 Aug 2016
Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea16:235352
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