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Resolving systemic financial crisis : policies and institutions

  • Claessens,Constantijn A.
  • Klingebiel, Daniela
  • Laeven, Luc

The authors analyze the role of institutions in resolving systemic banking crises for a broad sample of countries. Banking crises are fiscally costly, especially when policies like substantial liquidity support, explicit government guarantees on financial institutions’ liabilities, and forbearance from prudential regulations are used. Higher fiscal outlays do not, however, accelerate the recovery from a crisis. Better institutions—less corruption, improved law and order, legal system, and bureaucracy—do. The authors find these results to be relatively robust to estimation techniques, including controlling for the effects of a poor institutional environment on the likelihood of financial crisis and the size of fiscal costs. Their results suggest that countries should use strict policies to resolve a crisis and use the crisis as an opportunity to implement medium-term structural reforms, which will also help avoid future systemic crises.

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Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 3377.

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Date of creation: 01 Aug 2004
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Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:3377
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  1. Michael P. Dooley & Jeffrey A. Frankel, 2003. "Managing Currency Crises in Emerging Markets," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number dool03-1, 07.
  2. Barry Eichengreen & Richard Portes, 1997. "Managing financial crises in emerging markets," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 193-225.
  3. Honohan, Patrick & Klingebiel, Daniela, 2003. "The fiscal cost implications of an accommodating approach to banking crises," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 27(8), pages 1539-1560, August.
  4. Barro, R.J., 1989. "Economic Growth In A Cross Section Of Countries," RCER Working Papers 201, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
  5. Michael M. Hutchison, . "A Cure Worse Than The Disease? Currency Crises and the Output Costs of IMF-Supported Stabilization Programs," EPRU Working Paper Series 01-09, Economic Policy Research Unit (EPRU), University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  6. Laeven, Luc & Klingebiel, Daniela & Kroszner, Randy, 2002. "Financial crises, financial dependence, and industry growth," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2855, The World Bank.
  7. Barry Eichengreen & Andrew K. Rose, 2003. "Does It Pay to Defend against a Speculative Attack?," NBER Chapters, in: Managing Currency Crises in Emerging Markets, pages 61-86 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Yung Chul Park & Jong-Wha Lee, 2001. "Recovery and Sustainability in East Asia," NBER Working Papers 8373, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Caprio, Gerard Jr. & Klingebiel, Daniela, 1996. "Bank insolvencies : cross-country experience," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1620, The World Bank.
  10. Kaufmann, Daniel & Kraay, Aart & Zoido-Lobaton, Pablo, 1999. "Governance matters," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2196, The World Bank.
  11. Michael Bordo & Barry Eichengreen & Daniela Klingebiel & Maria Soledad Martinez-Peria, 2001. "Is the crisis problem growing more severe?," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 16(32), pages 51-82, 04.
  12. Reinhart, Carmen & Goldstein, Morris & Kaminsky, Graciela, 2000. "Assessing financial vulnerability, an early warning system for emerging markets: Introduction," MPRA Paper 13629, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  13. Brock, Philip L, 2000. "Financial Safety Nets: Lessons from Chile," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 15(1), pages 69-84, February.
  14. Michael P. Dooley & Sujata Verma, 2001. "Rescue Packages and Output Losses Following Crises," NBER Working Papers 8315, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Stijn Claessens & Daniela Klingebiel & Luc Laeven, 2001. "Financial Restructuring in Banking and Corporate Sector Crises: What Policies to Pursue?," NBER Working Papers 8386, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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