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Service with a Smile

Author

Listed:
  • Ejaz Ghani
  • Arti Grover Goswami
  • Homi Kharas

Abstract

Can service be a growth escalator? The world is experiencing its third industrial revolution, and services are at the forefront of this revolution. Services have already surpassed industry as a source of economic growth and job creation, in both developed and developing economies. In the industrial sector, technologies have matured and employment is shrinking. However, services are getting more sophisticated and jobs are expanding. Services growth is also more inclusive and sustainable. It increases the participation of women in the labor force and places a lighter burden on natural resources. The promise of the services revolution is that countries do not need to wait to get started with rapid development. There is a new boat that development latecomers can take.
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Suggested Citation

  • Ejaz Ghani & Arti Grover Goswami & Homi Kharas, 2012. "Service with a Smile," World Bank Other Operational Studies 17068, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wboper:17068
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ghani, Ejaz & O'Connell, Stephen D., 2014. "Can service be a growth escalator in low-income countries ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6971, The World Bank.
    2. Peter Daniels & Pengfei Ni, 2014. "Urbanisation and changes in the sectoral structure of economic development: the scale of the manufacturing sector in Chinese cities and the shift towards service industry," Working Papers hal-00943972, HAL.
    3. Zheng, Jianghuai & Zhang, Lili & Wang, Yu, 2010. "The underdevelopment of service industry in China: an empirical study of cities in Yangtze River Delta," MPRA Paper 33125, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Jun 2011.
    4. Jianghuai Zheng & Lili Zhang & Yu Wang, 2011. "The underdevelopment of service industry in china: An empirical study of cities in Yangtze River Delta," Frontiers of Economics in China, Springer;Higher Education Press, vol. 6(3), pages 413-446, September.
    5. Kojo, Naoko C., 2014. "Demystifying Dutch disease," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6981, The World Bank.
    6. Justin Yifu Lin & Célestin Monga & Samuel Standaert, 2017. "The Inclusive Substainable Transformation Index," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 17/932, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
    7. Justin Lin & Monga Célestin & Standaert Samuel, 2017. "Working Paper 257 - The Inclusive and Sustainable Transformation Index," Working Paper Series 2368, African Development Bank.
    8. Chuhan-Pole Punam & Francisco H.G. Ferreira, "undated". "Africa's Pulse, October 2014," World Bank Other Operational Studies 20870, The World Bank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Public Sector Corruption and Anticorruption Measures Banks and Banking Reform Economic Theory and Research Information and Communication Technologies - ICT Policy and Strategies Poverty Reduction - Achieving Shared Growth Finance and Financial Sector Development Macroeconomics and Economic Growth Public Sector Development;

    JEL classification:

    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights
    • O4 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity

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