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After-School Center-based Care and Children's Development

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  • Felfe, Christina

    ()

  • Zierow, Larissa

    ()

Abstract

What is the impact of after-school center-based care on the development of primary schoolaged children? Answering this question is challenging due to non-random selection of children into after-school center-based care. We tackle this challenge by using detailed data of the German Child Panel and employing a value added method. While we do not find significant effects on average, our analysis provides evidence for beneficial returns to afterschool center-based care attendance for more disadvantaged children. To be more precise, children of less-educated mothers and low-income families benefit from attending after-school care centers in terms of their socio-behavioral development.

Suggested Citation

  • Felfe, Christina & Zierow, Larissa, 2013. "After-School Center-based Care and Children's Development," Economics Working Paper Series 1338, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
  • Handle: RePEc:usg:econwp:2013:38
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    File URL: http://ux-tauri.unisg.ch/RePEc/usg/econwp/EWP-1338.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:ces:ifobei:76 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:eee:labeco:v:55:y:2018:i:c:p:259-281 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Felfe, Christina & Zierow, Larissa, 2018. "From dawn till dusk: Implications of full-day care for children’s development," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 259-281.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Child care; child development; value added estimation;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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