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Inflation Risk Premia and Survey Evidence on Macroeconomic Uncertainty


  • Paul Söderlind



Nominal and real U.S. interest rates (1997-2007) are combined with inflation expectations from the Survey of Professional Forecasters to calculate time series of "inflation risk premia." It is shown that survey data on inflation and output growth uncertainty, as well as a proxy for liquidity premia can explain a large amount of the variation in these risk premia.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul Söderlind, 2008. "Inflation Risk Premia and Survey Evidence on Macroeconomic Uncertainty," University of St. Gallen Department of Economics working paper series 2008 2008-12, Department of Economics, University of St. Gallen.
  • Handle: RePEc:usg:dp2008:2008-12

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Joyce, Michael A.S. & Lildholdt, Peter & Sorensen, Steffen, 2010. "Extracting inflation expectations and inflation risk premia from the term structure: A joint model of the UK nominal and real yield curves," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 281-294, February.
    2. Lahiri, Kajal & Teigland, Christie & Zaporowski, Mark, 1988. "Interest Rates and the Subjective Probability Distribution of Inflation Forecasts," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 20(2), pages 233-248, May.
    3. Alexander David, 2008. "Heterogeneous Beliefs, Speculation, and the Equity Premium," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 63(1), pages 41-83, February.
    4. Kajuth, Florian & Watzka, Sebastian, 2011. "Inflation expectations from index-linked bonds: Correcting for liquidity and inflation risk premia," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 51(3), pages 225-235, June.
    5. Garcí­a, Juan Angel & Manzanares, Andrés, 2007. "What can probability forecasts tell us about inflation risks?," Working Paper Series 825, European Central Bank.
    6. Giordani, Paolo & Soderlind, Paul, 2003. "Inflation forecast uncertainty," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(6), pages 1037-1059, December.
    7. Reschreiter, Andreas, 2004. "Conditional funding costs of inflation-indexed and conventional government bonds," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 1299-1318, June.
    8. Evan W. Anderson & Eric Ghysels & Jennifer L. Juergens, 2005. "Do Heterogeneous Beliefs Matter for Asset Pricing?," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 18(3), pages 875-924.
    9. Olesya V. Grishchenko & Jing-zhi Huang, 2012. "Inflation risk premium: evidence from the TIPS market," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2012-06, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    10. Charles T. Carlstrom & Timothy S. Fuerst, 2004. "Expected inflation and TIPS," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue Nov.
    11. Gianna Boero & Jeremy Smith & KennethF. Wallis, 2008. "Uncertainty and Disagreement in Economic Prediction: The Bank of England Survey of External Forecasters," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(530), pages 1107-1127, July.
    12. Meredith J. Beechey & Benjamin K. Johannsen & Andrew T. Levin, 2011. "Are Long-Run Inflation Expectations Anchored More Firmly in the Euro Area Than in the United States?," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(2), pages 104-129, April.
    13. Refet S Gürkaynak & Andrew Levin & Eric Swanson, 2010. "Does Inflation Targeting Anchor Long-Run Inflation Expectations? Evidence from the U.S., UK, and Sweden," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 8(6), pages 1208-1242, December.
    14. Pu Shen, 2006. "Liquidity risk premia and breakeven inflation rates," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q II, pages 29-54.
    15. Dean Croushore, 1993. "Introducing: the survey of professional forecasters," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Nov, pages 3-15.
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    Cited by:

    1. Felix Geiger & Oliver Sauter & Kai D. Schmid, 2009. "The Camp View of Inflation Forecasts," Diskussionspapiere aus dem Institut für Volkswirtschaftslehre der Universität Hohenheim 320/2009, Department of Economics, University of Hohenheim, Germany.
    2. Kajuth, Florian & Watzka, Sebastian, 2011. "Inflation expectations from index-linked bonds: Correcting for liquidity and inflation risk premia," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 51(3), pages 225-235, June.
    3. Urszula Szcserbowicz, 2011. "Are unconventional monetary policies effective?," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2011-15, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).

    More about this item


    break-even inflation; liquidity premium; Survey of Professional Forecasters;

    JEL classification:

    • E27 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • E47 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications

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