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Optimal health investment with separable and non-separable preferences

Author

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  • Azomahou, Theophile

    () (UNU-MERIT/MGSoG, Maastricht University)

  • Soete, Luc

    () (UNU-MERIT/MGSoG, Maastricht University)

  • Diene, Bity

    (University of Auvergne, CERDI)

  • Diene, Mbaye

    (University Cheikh-Anta-Diop, CRES)

Abstract

We use a general equilibrium framework to study optimal health investment in a dynamic model where agents derive utility from consumption and health. The steady state and the dynamics of the model are studied under separable and non-separable preferences. A shock undermining health which increases health expenditure and weakens the income base, not only affects savings but also compromises the consumption capacity. The magnitude of the effects strongly depends on the preferences. The dynamics of the model includes the equilibrium dynamics and bifurcations. Simulation experiments lend additional supports to our findings in favor of the non-separable preferences.

Suggested Citation

  • Azomahou, Theophile & Soete, Luc & Diene, Bity & Diene, Mbaye, 2012. "Optimal health investment with separable and non-separable preferences," MERIT Working Papers 047, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:unumer:2012047
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    File URL: https://www.merit.unu.edu/publications/wppdf/2012/wp2012-047.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Wang, Min & Zhao, Jinhua & Bhattacharya, Joydeep, 2015. "Optimal health and environmental policies in a pollution-growth nexus," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 160-179.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    network formation; strategic alliances; innovation; network strategy; interfirm networks;

    JEL classification:

    • L14 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Transactional Relationships; Contracts and Reputation
    • L20 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - General
    • D85 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Network Formation
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General

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