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Optimal health investment and preferences structure

Author

Listed:
  • T Azomahou

    (United Nations University - MERIT)

  • Bity Diene

    (CERDI - Centre d'Études et de Recherches sur le Développement International - UdA - Université d'Auvergne - Clermont-Ferrand I - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Mbaye Diene

    (UCAD - Université Cheikh Anta Diop [Dakar, Sénégal])

  • Luc Soete

    (UNU-MERIT - United Nations University - United Nations University)

Abstract

This paper develops a general equilibrium framework to study the role of preferences structure (additive, multiplicative and convex combination of both) in connecting consumption, health investment, stock of health and capital, and their effects on the wage rate and on productivity. We show that the elasticities of health production, health investment and health cost determine jointly how health influences the wage rate. We examine the steady state and the equilibrium dynamics of the model. In the case of additive preferences, the existence of equilibrium and the stability of the dynamic system require that the ratio of the elasticities of the cost of health and health investment is greater than the elasticity of the production function of health. Health stock can have either positive or negative effects on wage rate. The reverse holds for multiplicative preferences and the effect of health stock on wage rate is always positive. L ongevity is a decreasing convex-concave function of the elasticity of inter-temporal substitution of health. We also compare the relative behavior of opportunity costs of health under preferences structure.

Suggested Citation

  • T Azomahou & Bity Diene & Mbaye Diene & Luc Soete, 2015. "Optimal health investment and preferences structure," Working Papers halshs-01144802, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:halshs-01144802
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-01144802
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Consumption; health investment; preferences structure; wage rates; longevity; opportunity costs;

    JEL classification:

    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development
    • C62 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Existence and Stability Conditions of Equilibrium
    • C61 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Optimization Techniques; Programming Models; Dynamic Analysis

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