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Is there a rationale to contact the unemployed right from the start? Evidence from a natural field experiment

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  • van Landeghem, Bert
  • Cörvers, Frank

    (ROA / Human capital in the region)

  • de Grip, Andries

    (Research Centre for Educ and Labour Mark)

Abstract

Active Labour Market Policies (ALMPs) often exclusively target towards the long-term unemployed. Although it might be more efficient to intervene earlier in order to prevent long-term unemployment rather than to cure it, the climate of austerity in Eurozone countries is spreading a tendency to further reduce the basic counselling for those who become unemployed. This study investigates the impact on employment chances of a relatively light and inexpensive intervention. In a field experiment in a public employment office in Flanders, a random selection of clients were invited for a mandatory information session in the first month of the unemployment spell, while the control group were invited after four months of unemployment. Although the average intention-to-treat effect we find is not significant, the early intervention appears to be very beneficial for those with low education.

Suggested Citation

  • van Landeghem, Bert & Cörvers, Frank & de Grip, Andries, 2016. "Is there a rationale to contact the unemployed right from the start? Evidence from a natural field experiment," ROA Research Memorandum 011, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:umaror:2016011
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Schiprowski, Amelie, 2017. "The Role of Caseworkers in Unemployment Insurance: Evidence from Unplanned Absences," IZA Discussion Papers 11040, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    active labour market policies; unemployment; natural field experiment;

    JEL classification:

    • D04 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Policy: Formulation; Implementation; Evaluation
    • D61 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Allocative Efficiency; Cost-Benefit Analysis
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy

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