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Including Children in Policy Responses to Economic Crises


  • Caroline Harper

    (Overseas Development Institute(ODI))

  • Nicola Jones

    (Overseas Development Institute(ODI))

  • Andy McKay

    (Overseas Development Institute(ODI))


This synthesis paper is motivated by a concern about the effects of the current financial crisis on children and their care givers, who are often particularly vulnerable when crises strike. Substantial evidence from developing countries associates negative growth with worse human development outcomes, particularly for children. A key reason for concern is that, if children are adversely affected by shocks, this often has lifelong and potentially inter-generational consequences. Inadequate nutrition at a critical time in a child's life, inadequate or absent health care at a critical moment, being withdrawn from school in order to work and/or being denied adequate child care and protection may all have consequences that cannot be reversed later, to say nothing of cases of avoidable infant and child mortality.

Suggested Citation

  • Caroline Harper & Nicola Jones & Andy McKay, 2010. "Including Children in Policy Responses to Economic Crises," Working papers 1003, UNICEF,Division of Policy and Strategy.
  • Handle: RePEc:uce:wpaper:1003

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ana Corbacho & Mercedes Garcia-Escribano & Gabriela Inchauste, 2007. "Argentina: Macroeconomic Crisis and Household Vulnerability ," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 11(1), pages 92-106, February.
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    3. Alberto Alesina & Filipe R. Campante & Guido Tabellini, 2008. "Why is Fiscal Policy Often Procyclical?," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 6(5), pages 1006-1036, September.
    4. Lisa Cameron, 2001. "The Impact Of The Indonesian Financial Crisis On Children: An Analysis Using The 100 Villages Data," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(1), pages 43-64.
    5. Cesar Calderon & Tatiana Didier, 2009. "Will FDI be Resilient in this Crisis?," World Bank Other Operational Studies 11000, The World Bank.
    6. Sami Bibi & John Cockburn & Massa Coulibaly & Luca Tiberti, 2009. "The Impact of the Increase in Food Prices on Child Poverty and the Policy Response in Mali," Papers inwopa09/66, Innocenti Working Papers.
    7. repec:hrv:faseco:34729976 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Sarah Baird & Jed Friedman & Norbert Schady, 2011. "Aggregate Income Shocks and Infant Mortality in the Developing World," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(3), pages 847-856, August.
    9. Block, Steven A. & Kiess, Lynnda & Webb, Patrick & Kosen, Soewarta & Moench-Pfanner, Regina & Bloem, Martin W. & Peter Timmer, C., 2004. "Macro shocks and micro outcomes: child nutrition during Indonesia's crisis," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 2(1), pages 21-44, March.
    10. Christiaensen, Luc & Alderman, Harold, 2004. "Child Malnutrition in Ethiopia: Can Maternal Knowledge Augment the Role of Income?," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 52(2), pages 287-312, January.
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    12. Beegle, Kathleen & Dehejia, Rajeev H. & Gatti, Roberta & Krutikova, Sofya, 2008. "The consequences of child labor : evidence from longitudinal data in rural Tanzania," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4677, The World Bank.
    13. Duryea, Suzanne & Lam, David & Levison, Deborah, 2007. "Effects of economic shocks on children's employment and schooling in Brazil," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 188-214, September.
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    More about this item


    transition shocks; public expenditures; social protection; social spending; crisis recovery; children's rights; economic policy; macroeconomics impacts; microeconomic impacts;

    JEL classification:

    • E6 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook
    • E2 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment
    • H5 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies
    • H12 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government - - - Crisis Management
    • O23 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Fiscal and Monetary Policy in Development
    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health
    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education


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