IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Including Children in Policy Responses to Economic Crises

  • Caroline Harper

    (Overseas Development Institute(ODI))

  • Nicola Jones

    (Overseas Development Institute(ODI))

  • Andy McKay

    (Overseas Development Institute(ODI))

This synthesis paper is motivated by a concern about the effects of the current financial crisis on children and their care givers, who are often particularly vulnerable when crises strike. Substantial evidence from developing countries associates negative growth with worse human development outcomes, particularly for children. A key reason for concern is that, if children are adversely affected by shocks, this often has lifelong and potentially inter-generational consequences. Inadequate nutrition at a critical time in a child's life, inadequate or absent health care at a critical moment, being withdrawn from school in order to work and/or being denied adequate child care and protection may all have consequences that cannot be reversed later, to say nothing of cases of avoidable infant and child mortality.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.unicef.org/socialpolicy/files/Including_Children_in_the_Policy_Responses_to_Economic_Crises.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by UNICEF,Division of Policy and Strategy in its series Working papers with number 1003.

as
in new window

Length: 128 pages
Date of creation: 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:uce:wpaper:1003
Contact details of provider: Postal: 3 United Nations Plaza
Phone: +1 212 326 7000
Fax: +1 212 888 7454
Web page: http://www.unicef.org
Email:

Order Information: Web: http://www.unicef.org/publications/socialpolicy

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Ana Corbacho & Mercedes Garcia-Escribano & Gabriela Inchauste, 2007. "Argentina: Macroeconomic Crisis and Household Vulnerability ," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 11(1), pages 92-106, 02.
  2. Alberto Alesina & Guido Tabellini, 2005. "Why Is Fiscal Policy Often Procyclical?," Working Papers 297, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
  3. Arbache, Jorge Saba & Page, John, 2007. "More growth or fewer collapses ? a new look at long run growth in Sub-Saharan Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4384, The World Bank.
  4. Cesar Calderon & Tatiana Didier, 2009. "Will FDI be Resilient in this Crisis?," World Bank Other Operational Studies 11000, The World Bank.
  5. Sarah Baird & Jed Friedman & Norbert Schady, 2011. "Aggregate Income Shocks and Infant Mortality in the Developing World," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(3), pages 847-856, August.
  6. Lisa A. Cameron, 2001. "The Impact of the Indonesian Financial Crisis on Children: An analysis using the 100 villages data," Papers inwopa01/10, Innocenti Working Papers.
  7. Dhanani, Shafiq & Islam, Iyanatul, 2002. "Poverty, Vulnerability and Social Protection in a Period of Crisis: The Case of Indonesia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(7), pages 1211-1231, July.
  8. Duryea, Suzanne & Lam, David & Levison, Deborah, 2007. "Effects of economic shocks on children's employment and schooling in Brazil," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 188-214, September.
  9. Pedro Conceicao & Namsuk Kim & Ronald Mendoza & Yanchun Zhang, 2009. "Human Development in Crisis," Working papers 0903, UNICEF,Division of Policy and Strategy.
  10. Beegle, Kathleen & Dehejia, Rajeev H. & Gatti, Roberta & Krutikova, Sofya, 2008. "The consequences of child labor : evidence from longitudinal data in rural Tanzania," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4677, The World Bank.
  11. Block, Steven A. & Kiess, Lynnda & Webb, Patrick & Kosen, Soewarta & Moench-Pfanner, Regina & Bloem, Martin W. & Peter Timmer, C., 2004. "Macro shocks and micro outcomes: child nutrition during Indonesia's crisis," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 2(1), pages 21-44, March.
  12. Christiaensen, Luc & Alderman, Harold, 2004. "Child Malnutrition in Ethiopia: Can Maternal Knowledge Augment the Role of Income?," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 52(2), pages 287-312, January.
  13. Ferreira, Francisco H. G. & Schady, Norbert, 2008. "Aggregate economic shocks, child schooling and child health," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4701, The World Bank.
  14. Ana Corbacho & Gerd Schwartz, 2002. "Mexico; Experiences with Pro-Poor Expenditure Policies," IMF Working Papers 02/12, International Monetary Fund.
  15. Sami Bibi & John Cockburn & Massa Coulibaly & Luca Tiberti, 2009. "The Impact of the Increase in Food Prices on Child Poverty and the Policy Response in Mali," Papers inwopa09/66, Innocenti Working Papers.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:uce:wpaper:1003. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Maria Clara Osorio)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.