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Is there really a Global Business Cycle? A Dynamic Factor Model with Stochastic Factor Selection


  • Tino Berger

    (University of Goettingen, Germany)

  • Lorenzo Pozzi

    (Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands)


We investigate the presence of international business cycles in macroeconomic aggregates (output, consumption, investment) using a panel of 60 countries over the period 1961 - 2014. The paper presents a Bayesian stochastic factor selection approach for dynamic factor models with predetermined factors. The literature has so far ignored model uncertainty in these models as common factors (i.e., global, regional or otherwise) are typically imposed but not tested for. We focus in particular on the existence of a global business cycle as the literature has, in our opinion unjustifiably, taken for granted its existence. In contrast to the literature, we find no evidence to support its presence.

Suggested Citation

  • Tino Berger & Lorenzo Pozzi, 2016. "Is there really a Global Business Cycle? A Dynamic Factor Model with Stochastic Factor Selection," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 16-088/VI, Tinbergen Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:tin:wpaper:20160088

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    Global business cycle; dynamic factor model; Bayesian; model selection;

    JEL classification:

    • C52 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Evaluation, Validation, and Selection
    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • F44 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Business Cycles

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