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Commuter Effects on Local Labour Markets: A German Modelling Study

Author

Listed:
  • Giovanni Russo

    (VU University Amsterdam)

  • Federico Tedeschi

    (University of Bologna)

  • Aura Reggiani

    (University of Bologna)

  • Peter Nijkamp

    (VU University Amsterdam)

Abstract

This paper offers an exploratory investigation of the effects of inbound commuter flows on employment in regional labour markets in Germany. For this purpose, we distinguish three main channels that may transmit the effects concerned: a crowding-out mechanism, and two labour demand effects, namely, an aggregate demand effect and a positive externality on vacancy creation. To this end, we develop a stepwise commuting impact model. Our results bring to light that, on the whole, commuter flows have a positive and robust effect on both employment and the number of jobs in the receiving labour market districts, but a distinctly negative effect on the share of jobs filled by resident workers. We then interpret the implications of our results, and, finally, we suggest ways in which the analysis could be improved and expanded. This discussion paper led to an article in Urban Studies (2014). Volume 51, issue 3(SI), pages 493-508.

Suggested Citation

  • Giovanni Russo & Federico Tedeschi & Aura Reggiani & Peter Nijkamp, 2011. "Commuter Effects on Local Labour Markets: A German Modelling Study," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 11-114/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:tin:wpaper:20110114
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    commuter flows; lacal labour markets;

    JEL classification:

    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure

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