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Optimal Central Bank Lending

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  • Andreas Schabert

    (Dortmund University, and University of Amsterdam)

Abstract

We analyze optimal monetary policy in a sticky pricemodel where the central bank supplies money outrightvia asset purchases and lends money temporarily againstcollateral. The terms of central bank lending affect ra-tioning of money and impact on macroeconomic aggre-gates. The central bank can set the policy rate and itsinflation target in a way that implements the first bestlong-run allocation, which is impossible if money weresupplied in a lump-sum way (as commonly assumed).Efficient central bank lending further increases gainsfrom macroeconomic stabilization beyond pure interestrate policy. This requires departing from a "Treasuries-only" regime.

Suggested Citation

  • Andreas Schabert, 2010. "Optimal Central Bank Lending," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 10-057/2, Tinbergen Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:tin:wpaper:20100057
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Christian Bredemeier & Christoph Kaufmann & Andreas Schabert, 2017. "Interest Rate Spreads and Forward Guidance," Working Paper Series in Economics 96, University of Cologne, Department of Economics.
    2. Markus Hörmann & Andreas Schabert, 2015. "A Monetary Analysis of Balance Sheet Policies," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 125(589), pages 1888-1917, December.
    3. repec:eee:dyncon:v:93:y:2018:i:c:p:92-114 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. van der Kwaak, Christiaan, 2017. "Financial Fragility and Unconventional Central Bank Lending Operations," Research Report 17005-EEF, University of Groningen, Research Institute SOM (Systems, Organisations and Management).
    5. Christian Bredemeier & Falko Juessen & Andreas Schabert, 2015. "Fiscal policy, interest rate spreads,and the zero lower bound," Working Paper Series in Economics 80, University of Cologne, Department of Economics.
    6. Schabert, Andreas, 2014. "Optimal monetary policy, asset purchases, and credit market frictions," Working Paper Series 1738, European Central Bank.
    7. Hilberg, Björn & Hollmayr, Josef, 2011. "Asset prices, collateral and unconventional monetary policy in a DSGE model," Working Paper Series 1373, European Central Bank.
    8. Christian Bredemeier & Falko Juessen & Andreas Schabert, 2017. "Fiscal Multipliers and Monetary Policy: Reconciling Theory and Evidence," Working Paper Series in Economics 95, University of Cologne, Department of Economics.
    9. Andreas Schabert, 2017. "Welfare-Enhancing Distributional Effects of Central Bank Asset Purchases," Working Paper Series in Economics 94, University of Cologne, Department of Economics.
    10. Hilberg, Björn & Hollmayr, Josef, 2013. "Asset prices, collateral, and unconventional monetary policy in a DSGE model," Discussion Papers 36/2013, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    11. Markus Hoermann & Andreas Schabert, 2011. "When is Quantitative Easing effective?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 11-001/2/DSF 6, Tinbergen Institute.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Optimal monetary policy; central bank instruments; collateralized lending; liquidity premium; inflation;

    JEL classification:

    • E4 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates
    • E5 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles

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