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Optimal monetary policy, asset purchases, and credit market frictions

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  • Schabert, Andreas

Abstract

This paper examines how credit market frictions affect optimal monetary policy and if there is a role for central bank asset purchases. We develop a sticky price model where money serves as the means of payment and ex-ante identical agents borrow/lend among each other. The credit market is distorted as borrowing is constrained by available collateral. We show that the central bank cannot implement the first best allocation and that optimal monetary policy mainly aims at stabilizing prices when only a single instrument is available. The central bank can however mitigate the credit market distortion in a welfare-enhancing way by purchasing loans at a favorable price, which relies on rationing the supply of money. JEL Classification: E4, E5, E32

Suggested Citation

  • Schabert, Andreas, 2014. "Optimal monetary policy, asset purchases, and credit market frictions," Working Paper Series 1738, European Central Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecb:ecbwps:20141738
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Fiorella De Fiore & Pedro Teles & Oreste Tristani, 2011. "Monetary Policy and the Financing of Firms," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(4), pages 112-142, October.
    2. Matteo Iacoviello, 2005. "House Prices, Borrowing Constraints, and Monetary Policy in the Business Cycle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(3), pages 739-764, June.
    3. Aloísio Araújo & Susan Schommer & Michael Woodford, 2015. "Conventional and Unconventional Monetary Policy with Endogenous Collateral Constraints," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(1), pages 1-43, January.
    4. Alan Greenspan & James Kennedy, 2008. "Sources and uses of equity extracted from homes," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(1), pages 120-144, spring.
    5. Kiyotaki, Nobuhiro & Moore, John, 1997. "Credit Cycles," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(2), pages 211-248, April.
    6. Schabert, Andreas, 2015. "Optimal central bank lending," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 157(C), pages 485-516.
    7. Cúrdia, Vasco & Woodford, Michael, 2011. "The central-bank balance sheet as an instrument of monetarypolicy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 54-79, January.
    8. Markus Hörmann & Andreas Schabert, 2015. "A Monetary Analysis of Balance Sheet Policies," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 125(589), pages 1888-1917, December.
    9. Han Chen & Vasco Cúrdia & Andrea Ferrero, 2012. "The Macroeconomic Effects of Large‐scale Asset Purchase Programmes," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 122(564), pages 289-315, November.
    10. Gertler, Mark & Karadi, Peter, 2011. "A model of unconventional monetary policy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 17-34, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Francesco Saraceno & Roberto Tamborini, 2015. "How can it work ? On the impact of quantitative easing in the Eurozone," Sciences Po publications 2015/03, Sciences Po.
    2. António Afonso, & Jorge Silva, 2017. "Effects of euro area monetary policy on institutional sectors: the case of Portugal," Working Papers Department of Economics 2017/15, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, Universidade de Lisboa.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    borrowing constraints; central bank asset purchases; money rationing; nominal rigidities; optimal monetary policy;

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles

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