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When is Quantitative Easing effective?

Author

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  • Markus Hoermann

    (TU Dortmund University)

  • Andreas Schabert

    (University of Amsterdam, and TU Dortmund University)

Abstract

We present a simple macroeconomic model with open market operations that allows examining the effects of quantitative and credit easing. The central bank controls the policy rate, i.e. the price of money in open market operations, as well as the amount and the type of assets that are accepted as collateral for money. When the policy rate is sufficiently low, this set-up gives rise to an (il-)liquidity premium on non-eligible assets. Then, a quantitative easing policy, which increases the size of the central bank's balance sheet, can increase real activity and prices, while a credit easing policy, which changes the composition of the balance sheet, can lower interest rate spreads, stimulate real activity, and reduce prices. The effectiveness of quantitative and credit easing is however limited to the extent that eligible assets are scarce. Nevertheless, they can help escaping from the zero lower bound.

Suggested Citation

  • Markus Hoermann & Andreas Schabert, 2011. "When is Quantitative Easing effective?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 11-001/2/DSF 6, Tinbergen Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:tin:wpaper:20110001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Katarzyna Nagraba, 2012. "Flexible approach in monetary policy during instability of the markets. Quantitative Easing Policy (Elastyczne podejscie w polityce pienieznej w czasach niestabilnosci rynkow. Polityka quantitative ea," Problemy Zarzadzania, University of Warsaw, Faculty of Management, vol. 10(39), pages 64-76.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Monetary policy; collateralized lending; quantitative easing; credit easing; liquidity premium; zero lower bound;

    JEL classification:

    • E4 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates
    • E5 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles

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