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Fiscal Policy, Interest Rate Spreads, and the Zero Lower Bound

Author

Listed:
  • Bredemeier, Christian

    () (University of Cologne)

  • Juessen, Falko

    () (University of Wuppertal)

  • Schabert, Andreas

    () (University of Cologne)

Abstract

This paper questions unconventional fiscal policy effects when the monetary policy rate is at the zero lower bound. We provide evidence for the US that the spread between the policy rate and the US-LIBOR, which is more relevant for private sector transactions, increases with government expenditures. We introduce a corresponding spread into an otherwise standard macroeconomic model which reproduces this observation. The model predicts that the fiscal multiplier takes conventional values, regardless of whether the policy rate follows a standard feedback rule or is at its zero lower bound. Likewise, labor tax increases exert contractionary effects in both cases.

Suggested Citation

  • Bredemeier, Christian & Juessen, Falko & Schabert, Andreas, 2015. "Fiscal Policy, Interest Rate Spreads, and the Zero Lower Bound," IZA Discussion Papers 8993, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp8993
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Fernández-Villaverde, Jesús & Gordon, Grey & Guerrón-Quintana, Pablo & Rubio-Ramírez, Juan F., 2015. "Nonlinear adventures at the zero lower bound," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 182-204.
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    9. Christopher Erceg & Jesper Lindé, 2014. "Is There A Fiscal Free Lunch In A Liquidity Trap?," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 12(1), pages 73-107, February.
    10. Fabio Canova & Evi Pappa, 2011. "Fiscal policy, pricing frictions and monetary accommodation," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 26(68), pages 555-598, October.
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    12. Karel R. S. M. Mertens & Morten O. Ravn, 2014. "Fiscal Policy in an Expectations-Driven Liquidity Trap," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 81(4), pages 1637-1667.
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    15. repec:aea:aejmac:v:11:y:2019:i:3:p:147-73 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Charles L. Evans, 2005. "Nominal Rigidities and the Dynamic Effects of a Shock to Monetary Policy," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(1), pages 1-45, February.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    fiscal multiplier; tax policy; interest rate spreads; zero lower bound; liquidity premium;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E42 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Monetary Sytsems; Standards; Regimes; Government and the Monetary System
    • E63 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Comparative or Joint Analysis of Fiscal and Monetary Policy; Stabilization; Treasury Policy

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