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Is Government Spending at the Zero Lower Bound Desirable?

Author

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  • Bilbiie, Florin Ovidiu
  • Monacelli, Tommaso
  • Perotti, Roberto

Abstract

Government spending at the zero lower bound (ZLB) is not necessarily welfare enhancing, even when its output multiplier is large. When government spending provides direct utility to the household, its optimal level is at most 0.5-1 percent of GDP for recessions of -4 percent; the numbers are higher for deeper recessions. When spending does not provide direct utility, it is generically welfare-detrimental: it should be kept unchanged at a long run-optimal value.

Suggested Citation

  • Bilbiie, Florin Ovidiu & Monacelli, Tommaso & Perotti, Roberto, 2014. "Is Government Spending at the Zero Lower Bound Desirable?," CEPR Discussion Papers 10210, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:10210
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Florin O. Bilbiie, 2011. "Nonseparable Preferences, Frisch Labor Supply, and the Consumption Multiplier of Government Spending: One Solution to a Fiscal Policy Puzzle," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 43(1), pages 221-251, February.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Philipp Engler & Juha Tervala, 2016. "Hysteresis and Fiscal Policy," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1631, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    2. Olivier Blanchard & Christopher J. Erceg & Jesper Lindé, 2017. "Jump-Starting the Euro-Area Recovery: Would a Rise in Core Fiscal Spending Help the Periphery?," NBER Macroeconomics Annual, University of Chicago Press, vol. 31(1), pages 103-182.
    3. Christian Bredemeier & Falko Juessen & Andreas Schabert, 2015. "Fiscal policy, interest rate spreads,and the zero lower bound," Working Paper Series in Economics 80, University of Cologne, Department of Economics.
    4. Adiya Belgibayeva & Michal Horvath, 2015. "Optimal Conventional Stabilization Policy in a Liquidity Trap When Wages and Prices are Sticky," Discussion Papers 15/11, Department of Economics, University of York.
    5. Hafedh Bouakez & Michel Guillard & Jordan Roulleau-Pasdeloup, 2016. "The Optimal Composition of Public Spending in a Deep Recession," Cahiers de Recherches Economiques du Département d'Econométrie et d'Economie politique (DEEP) 16.09, Université de Lausanne, Faculté des HEC, DEEP.
    6. Stephanie Schmitt-Grohé & Martín Uribe, 2017. "Liquidity Traps and Jobless Recoveries," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 9(1), pages 165-204, January.
    7. Gilles Dufrénot & Aurélia Jambois & Laurine Jambois & Guillaume Khayat, 2016. "Regime-Dependent Fiscal Multipliers in the United States," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 27(5), pages 923-944, November.
    8. António R. Antunes & Valerio Ercolani, 2016. "Public debt expansions and the dynamics of the household borrowing constraint," Working Papers w201618, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    government spending multiplier; welfare; zero lower bound;

    JEL classification:

    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy

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