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Healthier when retiring earlier? Evidence from France

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  • Pierre-Jean Messe
  • François-Charles Wolff

Abstract

This paper contributes to the literature on the health-retirement relationship by looking at the effect of retiring before legal age on health in later life in France. To account for the endogeneity of the early retirement decision, our identification strategy relies on eligibility rules to a long-career-based early retirement scheme introduced in France starting from 2004 that substantially increased the proportion of older workers leaving their last job before the legal age of 60 years. We find a positive association between early retirement treated first as exogenous and health problems among retirees. However, we fail to evidence any causal effect of early retirement on poor health once we account for the endogeneity of the decision to retire before the legal age. Controlling for working conditions has no influence on our results and occupying a demanding job is harmful to health after retirement regardless of the retirement date.
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Suggested Citation

  • Pierre-Jean Messe & François-Charles Wolff, 2017. "Healthier when retiring earlier? Evidence from France," TEPP Working Paper 2017-09, TEPP.
  • Handle: RePEc:tep:teppwp:wp17-09
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