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What Explains The Difference In The Effect Of Retirement On Health? Evidence From Global Aging Data

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  • Yoshinori Nishimura
  • Masato Oikawa
  • Hiroyuki Motegi

Abstract

This paper analyzes the reasons for differences in the estimated effect of retirement on health in previous studies. We investigate these differences by focusing on the analysis methods used by these studies. Using various health indexes, numerous researchers have examined the effects of retirement on health. However, there are no unified views on the impact of retirement on various health indexes. Consequently, we show that the choice of analysis method is one of the key factors in explaining why the estimated results of the effect of retirement on health differ. Moreover, we re†estimate the effect of retirement on health by using a fixed analysis method controlling for individual heterogeneity and endogeneity of the retirement behavior. We analyze the effect of retirement on health parameters, such as cognitive function, self†report of health, activities of daily living (ADL), depression, and body mass index in eight countries. We find that the effects of retirement on self†report of health, depression, and ADL are positive in many of these countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Yoshinori Nishimura & Masato Oikawa & Hiroyuki Motegi, 2018. "What Explains The Difference In The Effect Of Retirement On Health? Evidence From Global Aging Data," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(3), pages 792-847, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jecsur:v:32:y:2018:i:3:p:792-847
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/joes.12215
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Carrino, Ludovico & Glaser, Karen & Avendano, Mauricio, 2018. "Later Pension, Poorer Health? Evidence from the New State Pension Age in the UK," MPRA Paper 87575, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. repec:eee:socmed:v:221:y:2019:i:c:p:27-39 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. A. Cazenave-Lacroutz & F. Godet, 2017. "Projecting with the Destinie microsimulation model the post-retirement without any severe disabilities life expectancy of the generations born between 1960 and 1990," Documents de Travail de l'Insee - INSEE Working Papers g2017-03, Institut National de la Statistique et des Etudes Economiques.
    4. Apouey, Bénédicte H. & Guven, Cahit & Senik, Claudia, 2019. "Retirement and Unexpected Health Shocks," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 116-123.
    5. Messe, Pierre-jean & Wolff, François-Charles, 2017. "Healthier when retiring earlier? Evidence from France," CEPREMAP Working Papers (Docweb) 1703, CEPREMAP.
    6. Kuusi, Tero & Martikainen, Pekka & Valkonen, Tarmo, 2019. "The Influence of Old-age Retirement on Health: Causal Evidence from the Finnish Register Data," ETLA Working Papers 67, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies

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