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Working in old age and health outcomes in Japan

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  • Kajitani, Shinya

Abstract

How does working in old age affect health status? We examine the impacts of the working hours of elderly Japanese men on their health outcome, taking into account an endogeneity between work and health. Utilizing panel data on the Japanese elderly, we found that while Japanese elderly males prefer to work for relatively fewer hours as they grow older, their health does not deteriorate if they continue to work in old age. These results suggest that the Japanese elderly can maintain their health by working with a relative decrease in labor hours.

Suggested Citation

  • Kajitani, Shinya, 2011. "Working in old age and health outcomes in Japan," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 153-162.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:japwor:v:23:y:2011:i:3:p:153-162
    DOI: 10.1016/j.japwor.2011.06.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Doreen Wing Han Au & Thomas F. Crossley & Martin Schellhorn, 2005. "The effect of health changes and long-term health on the work activity of older Canadians," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(10), pages 999-1018.
    2. Stefanie Behncke, 2009. "How Does Retirement Affect Health?," University of St. Gallen Department of Economics working paper series 2009 2009-13, Department of Economics, University of St. Gallen.
    3. Anne Case & Angus S. Deaton, 2005. "Broken Down by Work and Sex: How Our Health Declines," NBER Chapters,in: Analyses in the Economics of Aging, pages 185-212 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Maarten Lindeboom & Marcel Kerkhofs, 2009. "Health and work of the elderly: subjective health measures, reporting errors and endogeneity in the relationship between health and work," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(6), pages 1024-1046.
    5. Currie, Janet & Madrian, Brigitte C., 1999. "Health, health insurance and the labor market," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 50, pages 3309-3416 Elsevier.
    6. Odelia Rosin, 2008. "The Economic Causes Of Obesity: A Survey," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(4), pages 617-647, September.
    7. Dhaval Dave & R. Inas Rashad & Jasmina Spasojevic, 2008. "The Effects of Retirement on Physical and Mental Health Outcomes," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 497-523, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Motegi, Hiroyuki & Nishimura, Yoshinori & Oikawa, Masato, 2016. "What Explains the Difference in the Effect of Retirement on Health?: Evidence from Global Aging Data," MPRA Paper 73963, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Motegi, H. & Nishimura, Y. & Oikawa, M., 2016. "Retirement and Cognitive Decline: Evidence from Global Aging Data," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 16/11, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    3. repec:eee:japwor:v:42:y:2017:i:c:p:56-63 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Disease; Elderly person; Retirement; Self-assessed health; Work;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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