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Retirement and Cognitive Decline: Evidence from Global Aging Data

Author

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  • Motegi, H.
  • Nishimura, Y.
  • Oikawa, M.

Abstract

This paper analyzes the effect of retirement on cognitive function in two ways. First, we analyze this effect by using cross-country variation of pension eligibility age, a method is used in the literature. The results suggest that the country heterogeneity largely influences the estimated result, which, in turn, can lead to the opposite interpretation depending on the analyzed countries. We show that the cross-country estimation is not appropriate when analyzing the effect of retirement on cognitive function. Second, we analyze the same effect in the U.S. and other countries by controlling for individual heterogeneity and endogeneity of the retirement behavior. Prior to empirically analyzing the effect, we clarify the effect of retirement on cognitive ability by using a simple economic model with two types of endogenous cognitive investment behaviors and an endogenous retirement. Our estimates indicate that retirement has a weak or no effect on cognitive ability immediately after retirement. However, the results depend on the analyzed countries and the type of cognitive scores employed. Additionally, we investigate the heterogeneity of this effect. For example, we find that the elderly with higher BMI (Body Mass Index) and fat intake experience a negative effect of retirement on cognitive function. When considering the retirement duration, the effect of retirement on cognitive function becomes negative as the retirement duration increases.

Suggested Citation

  • Motegi, H. & Nishimura, Y. & Oikawa, M., 2016. "Retirement and Cognitive Decline: Evidence from Global Aging Data," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 16/11, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  • Handle: RePEc:yor:hectdg:16/11
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Messe, Pierre-jean & Wolff, François-Charles, 2017. "Healthier when retiring earlier? Evidence from France," CEPREMAP Working Papers (Docweb) 1703, CEPREMAP.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    mental retirement; cognitive function; social security; pension eligibility age; cross-country instruments; global aging data;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies

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