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Retiring to the good life? The short-term effects of retirement on health

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  • Johnston, David W.
  • Lee, Wang-Sheng

Abstract

We estimate the impact of retirement on three subjective and two objective measures of health using a regression discontinuity design. The results indicate that retirement increases an individual's sense of well-being and their mental health, but not necessarily their physical health. Specification tests suggest that the results are robust.

Suggested Citation

  • Johnston, David W. & Lee, Wang-Sheng, 2009. "Retiring to the good life? The short-term effects of retirement on health," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 103(1), pages 8-11, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:103:y:2009:i:1:p:8-11
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    4. Imbens, Guido W. & Lemieux, Thomas, 2008. "Regression discontinuity designs: A guide to practice," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 142(2), pages 615-635, February.
    5. Dhaval Dave & R. Inas Rashad & Jasmina Spasojevic, 2008. "The Effects of Retirement on Physical and Mental Health Outcomes," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 497-523, October.
    6. Hahn, Jinyong & Todd, Petra & Van der Klaauw, Wilbert, 2001. "Identification and Estimation of Treatment Effects with a Regression-Discontinuity Design," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 69(1), pages 201-209, January.
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