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Mental retirement and schooling

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  • Bingley, Paul
  • Martinello, Alessandro

Abstract

We assess the validity of differences in eligibility ages for early and old age pension benefits as instruments for estimating the effect of retirement on cognitive functioning. Because differences in eligibility ages across country and gender are correlated with differences in years of schooling, which affect cognitive functioning at old ages, they are invalid as instruments without controlling for schooling. We show by means of simulation and a replication study that unless the model incorporates schooling, the estimated effect of retirement is negatively biased. This explains a large part of the “mental retirement” effects which have recently been found.

Suggested Citation

  • Bingley, Paul & Martinello, Alessandro, 2013. "Mental retirement and schooling," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 292-298.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eecrev:v:63:y:2013:i:c:p:292-298 DOI: 10.1016/j.euroecorev.2013.01.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Daniel A. Kamhöfer & Hendrik Schmitz, 2013. "Analyzing Zero Returns to Education in Germany – Heterogeneous Eff ects and Skill Formation," Ruhr Economic Papers 0446, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    2. Peter Eibich, 2014. "Understanding the Effect of Retirement on Health Using Regression Discontinuity Design," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 669, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    3. Marco Bertoni & Giorgio Brunello, 2014. "Pappa Ante Portas: The Retired Husband Syndrome in Japan," "Marco Fanno" Working Papers 0182, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche "Marco Fanno".
    4. Fabrizio Mazzonna & Franco Peracchi, 2017. "Unhealthy Retirement?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 52(1), pages 128-151.
    5. repec:zbw:rwirep:0446 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. de Grip, Andries & Dupuy, Arnaud & Jolles, Jelle & van Boxtel, Martin, 2015. "Retirement and cognitive development in the Netherlands: Are the retired really inactive?," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 19(C), pages 157-169.
    7. Daniel A. Kamhöfer & Hendrik Schmitz, 2013. "Analyzing Zero Returns to Education in Germany: Heterogeneous Effects and Skill Formation," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 598, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    8. Raquel Fonseca & Arie Kapteyn & Gema Zamarro, 2016. "Retirement and Cognitive Functioning: International Evidence," Cahiers de recherche 1610, Chaire de recherche Industrielle Alliance sur les enjeux économiques des changements démographiques.
    9. Fabrizio Mazzonna & Franco Peracchi, 2014. "Unhealthy retirement? Evidence of occupation heterogeneity," IdEP Economic Papers 1401, USI Università della Svizzera italiana.
    10. repec:spr:eujhec:v:18:y:2017:i:7:d:10.1007_s10198-016-0828-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Rafael NOVELLA & Javier OLIVERA, 2014. "Mental retirement and non-contributory pensions for the elderly poor in Peru," Working Papers Department of Economics ces14.05, KU Leuven, Faculty of Economics and Business, Department of Economics.
    12. Messe, Pierre-jean & Wolff, François-Charles, 2017. "Healthier when retiring earlier? Evidence from France," CEPREMAP Working Papers (Docweb) 1703, CEPREMAP.
    13. Motegi, Hiroyuki & Nishimura, Yoshinori & Oikawa, Masato, 2016. "What Explains the Difference in the Effect of Retirement on Health?: Evidence from Global Aging Data," MPRA Paper 73963, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Motegi, H. & Nishimura, Y. & Oikawa, M., 2016. "Retirement and Cognitive Decline: Evidence from Global Aging Data," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 16/11, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    15. Eibich, Peter, 2015. "Understanding the effect of retirement on health: Mechanisms and heterogeneity," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 1-12.
    16. Martina Celidoni & Chiara Dal Bianco & Guglielmo Weber, 2013. "Early retirement and cognitive decline. A longitudinal analysis using SHARE data," "Marco Fanno" Working Papers 0174, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche "Marco Fanno".
    17. Hélène Blake & Clémentine Garrouste, 2017. "Collateral effects of a pension reform in France," Working Papers hal-01500683, HAL.
    18. Martina Celidoni & Vincenzo Rebba, 2015. "Healthier lifestyles after retirement in Europe? Evidence from SHARE," "Marco Fanno" Working Papers 0201, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche "Marco Fanno".
    19. Bonsang, Eric & Dohmen, Thomas, 2015. "Risk attitude and cognitive aging," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 112-126.
    20. Clouston, Sean A.P. & Denier, Nicole, 2017. "Mental retirement and health selection: Analyses from the U.S. Health and Retirement Study," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 178(C), pages 78-86.

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