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Coal Smoke, City Growth, and the Cost of the Industrial Revolution

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  • W. Walker Hanlon

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  • W. Walker Hanlon, 2018. "Coal Smoke, City Growth, and the Cost of the Industrial Revolution," Working Papers 18-21, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ste:nystbu:18-21
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    References listed on IDEAS

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