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Travel-to-work. Which factors matter? An analysis on regional labor markets in the Uk

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  • Bergantino, Angela Stefania
  • Madio, Leonardo

Abstract

The study focuses on the role of positive and negative monetary incentives in stimulating infra and inter-regional mobility (through commuting behaviors) in the UK, using data from the Quarterly Labour Force Survey 2004-2011. In particular, we first estimate a Monetary Incentive Index (MII), based on the ratio between the current wage and the potential wage for the region of residence through OLS and then we study how monetary incentives affect the probability of moving to other UK regions and Metropolitan areas. Using a Multinomial Logit we find that, when the MII is higher than 20%, the probability of commuting more than 45 minutes to other regional labor markets increases by 2.2% for female workers and by 3.2% for male workers, with significant differences between regions and Metropoli- tan areas. Further, we find also support for the “household responsibility hypothesis” and for the attractiveness of the Greater London Region.

Suggested Citation

  • Bergantino, Angela Stefania & Madio, Leonardo, 2016. "Travel-to-work. Which factors matter? An analysis on regional labor markets in the Uk," Working Papers 16_1, SIET Società Italiana di Economia dei Trasporti e della Logistica.
  • Handle: RePEc:sit:wpaper:16_1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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