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Regional Commuting in Italy: Do Temporary Contracts Affect the Decision?

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  • Angela Parenti

    ()

  • Cristina Tealdi

Abstract

In this paper we study how the determinants of regional commuting in Italy have evolved in the past fifteen years. Using labour force data from 1992 to 2008 we estimate a model where the probability of commuting is regressed on a wide set of individual, job, firm and regional characteristics. Specifically, we focus on understanding how the increased exibility of the labour market in the late nineties/early twenties have affected the individual decision to commute across regions. Consistent with the previous literature, we identify specific types of individual working in firms with well-defined features who are more keen to commute. However, even though temporary employees tend to commute more than permanent employees, the increased utilization of temporary contracts did not have a strong impact on the commuting decisions of Italian workers.

Suggested Citation

  • Angela Parenti & Cristina Tealdi, 2015. "Regional Commuting in Italy: Do Temporary Contracts Affect the Decision?," ERSA conference papers ersa15p1232, European Regional Science Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa15p1232
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Angela Parenti & Cristina Tealdi, 2015. "Regional Commuting in Italy: Do Temporary Contracts Affect the Decision?," ERSA conference papers ersa15p1232, European Regional Science Association.
    2. Kent Eliasson & Urban Lindgren & Olle Westerlund, 2003. "Geographical Labour Mobility: Migration or Commuting?," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(8), pages 827-837.
    3. Lorenzo Cappellari & Carlo Dell’Aringa & Marco Leonardi, 2012. "Temporary Employment, Job Flows and Productivity: A Tale of Two Reforms," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 122(562), pages 188-215, August.
    4. Jeffrey M Wooldridge, 2010. "Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 2, volume 1, number 0262232588, September.
    5. DaVanzo, Julie, 1978. "Does Unemployment Affect Migration?-Evidence from Micro Data," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 60(4), pages 504-514, November.
    6. Peter Huber & Klaus Nowotny, 2013. "Moving across Borders: Who is Willing to Migrate or to Commute?," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(9), pages 1462-1481, October.
    7. Javier Romani & Jordi Surinach & Manuel Artiis, 2003. "Are Commuting and Residential Mobility Decisions Simultaneous?: The Case of Catalonia, Spain," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(8), pages 813-826.
    8. Cristian Bartolucci & Mathis Wagner & Claudia Villosio, 2013. "Who Migrates and Why?," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 333, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
    9. Tealdi, Cristina, 2011. "Typical and atypical employment contracts: the case of Italy," MPRA Paper 39456, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Burridge, Peter & Gordon, Ian Richard, 1981. "Unemployment in the British Metropolitan Labour Areas," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 33(2), pages 274-297, July.
    11. Pissarides, Christopher A & Wadsworth, Jonathan, 1989. "Unemployment and the Inter-regional Mobility of Labour," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 99(397), pages 739-755, September.
    12. Pierella Paci & Erwin R. Tiongson & Mateusz Walewski & Jacek Liwinski & Maria M. Stoilkova, 2007. "Internal Labor Mobility in Central Europe and the Baltic Region," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6598, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Angela Stefania Bergantino & Leonardo Madio, 2019. "Intra‐ and inter‐regional commuting: Assessing the role of wage differentials," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 98(2), pages 1085-1114, April.
    2. Angela Parenti & Cristina Tealdi, 2015. "Regional Commuting in Italy: Do Temporary Contracts Affect the Decision?," Discussion Papers 2015/203, Dipartimento di Economia e Management (DEM), University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Commuting; Mobility; Regional studies; Labour market;

    JEL classification:

    • J41 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Labor Contracts
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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