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Excess Commuting: A Critical Review

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  • Kang‐Rae Ma
  • David Banister

Abstract

Excess commuting is the additional journey‐to‐work travel represented by the difference between the actual average commute and the smallest possible average commute, given the spatial configuration of workplace and residential sites. Research on excess commuting has been carried out over the last 20 years since the seminal contribution of Hamilton (1982). The literature has generated much debate and controversy, and the purpose of this review paper is to assess that material critically under three main headings: contextual, methodological and policy‐related issues. The key contextual questions relate to the assumptions of transport optimization or cost minimization, socio‐economic factors, and how these are linked to urban spatial structure. The methodological issues cover spatial structure, aggregation, time or distance measures, and the boundary problem, whilst the policy‐oriented questions relate to the understanding of the effects of taking particular actions, including the behavioural response to policy initiatives.

Suggested Citation

  • Kang‐Rae Ma & David Banister, 2006. "Excess Commuting: A Critical Review," Transport Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(6), pages 749-767, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:transr:v:26:y:2006:i:6:p:749-767 DOI: 10.1080/01441640600782609
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ari Tarigan & Stian Bayer & Christin Berg, 2011. "Suburbanisation of employment means less sustainable travel? - The effects of policy location on commuters' travel patterns in the Stavanger region, Norway," ERSA conference papers ersa10p1648, European Regional Science Association.
    2. repec:gam:jsusta:v:8:y:2016:i:2:p:122:d:63105 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Vincent Viguié, 2015. "Cross-commuting and housing prices in a polycentric modeling of cities," Policy Papers 2015.03, FAERE - French Association of Environmental and Resource Economists.
    4. Xiang Zhou & Xiaohong Chen & Tianran Zhang, 2016. "Impact of Megacity Jobs-Housing Spatial Mismatch on Commuting Behaviors: A Case Study on Central Districts of Shanghai, China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(2), pages 1-22, January.
    5. Murphy, Enda, 2009. "Excess commuting and modal choice," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 43(8), pages 735-743, October.
    6. Angela Stefania Bergantino & Leonardo Madio, 2015. "The Travel-to-work. Which factors matter? An analysis on regional labor market in UK," ERSA conference papers ersa15p888, European Regional Science Association.
    7. Niedzielski, Michael A. & Horner, Mark W. & Xiao, Ningchuan, 2013. "Analyzing scale independence in jobs-housing and commute efficiency metrics," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 129-143.
    8. Jianghong Li & Matthias Pollmann-Schult, 2016. "Fathers’ Commute to Work and Children’s Social and Emotional Well-Being in Germany," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 37(3), pages 488-501, September.
    9. Morton O’Kelly & Michael Niedzielski & Justin Gleeson, 2012. "Spatial interaction models from Irish commuting data: variations in trip length by occupation and gender," Journal of Geographical Systems, Springer, vol. 14(4), pages 357-387, October.
    10. Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Molina, José Alberto & Velilla, Jorge, 2015. "Excess Commuting in the US: Differences between the Self-Employed and Employees," IZA Discussion Papers 9425, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Molina, José Alberto & Velilla, Jorge, 2016. "Commuting Time and Sex Ratios in the US," IZA Discussion Papers 9933, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Molina, José Alberto & Velilla, Jorge, 2016. "A Wage-Efficiency Spatial Model for US Self-Employed Workers," IZA Discussion Papers 9634, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Molina, José Alberto & Velilla, Jorge, 2016. "Spatial Distribution of US Employment in an Urban Wage-Efficiency Setting," IZA Discussion Papers 9720, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    14. van Ommeren, Jos N. & van der Straaten, J. Willemijn, 2008. "The effect of search imperfections on commuting behaviour: Evidence from employed and self-employed workers," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 127-147, March.
    15. J. Ignacio, Giménez-Nadal & Jose Alberto, Molina & Jorge, Velilla, 2017. "Leisure and effort at work: incorporating self-employment into urban markets," MPRA Paper 77972, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Suzuki, Tsutomu & Lee, Sohee, 2012. "Jobs–housing imbalance, spatial correlation, and excess commuting," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 322-336.
    17. Bergantino, Angela Stefania & Madio, Leonardo, 2016. "Travel-to-work. Which factors matter? An analysis on regional labor markets in the Uk," Working Papers 16_1, SIET Società Italiana di Economia dei Trasporti e della Logistica.
    18. Khandker Habib, 2014. "Household-level commuting mode choices, car allocation and car ownership level choices of two-worker households: the case of the city of Toronto," Transportation, Springer, pages 651-672.
    19. Timothy Welch & Sabyasachee Mishra, 2014. "Envisioning an emission diet: application of travel demand mechanisms to facilitate policy decision making," Transportation, Springer, pages 611-631.
    20. Duranton, Gilles & Puga, Diego, 2015. "Urban Land Use," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, Elsevier.
    21. Mark J. Kutzbach, 2010. "Access to Workers or Employers? An Intra-Urban Analysis of Plant Location Decisions," Working Papers 10-21r, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau, revised Sep 2012.

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