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Immigration and Nationalism: The Importance of Identity

Author

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  • Francesco Flaviano Russo

    () (Università di Napoli Federico II and CSEF)

Abstract

Increased immigration in Italy has been coupled with a change in the composition of the stock of immigrants by nationality. Migrants that come from different coun- tries and cultures bring with them different languages, habits, norms, religions and, in general, interact differently with the local population, thereby generating different re- sponses to immigration. I study the relationship between this changes in the identity of the migrants and the electoral outcomes in Italy computing several measures of distance between immigrants and natives with respect to the language spoken, to religion and to genetic factors that, being correlated with the vertical transmission of norms and values, proxy for a wide range of both cultural and individual traits. I find that the increased distance between immigrants and natives is associated with more votes for nationalist, anti-immigration political parties.

Suggested Citation

  • Francesco Flaviano Russo, 2018. "Immigration and Nationalism: The Importance of Identity," CSEF Working Papers 511, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
  • Handle: RePEc:sef:csefwp:511
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    File URL: http://www.csef.it/WP/wp511.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    5. Cristina Cattaneo & Carlo V. Fiorio & Giovanni Peri, 2015. "What Happens to the Careers of European Workers When Immigrants “Take Their Jobs”?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 50(3), pages 655-693.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Elections; Culture; Language; Religion.;

    JEL classification:

    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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