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Promotion, Turnover and Compensation in the Executive Market

Author

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  • George-Levi Gayle

    (Carnegie Mellon)

  • Limor Golan

    (Carnegie Mellon)

  • Robert A. Miller

    (Carnegie Mellon)

Abstract

This paper is an empirical study of the market for managers, more specifically the effects of agency, human capital, and preferences on their promotion, tenure, turnover and compensation. From a large longitudinal data set compiled from observations on executives and their publicly listed firms, we construct a career hierarchy and report on its main features. Our summary results motivate a dynamic competitive equilibrium model, whose parameters we identify and estimate. Controlling for heterogeneity amongst firms, which differ by size and sector, and also managers, whose backgrounds vary by age, gender and education, our estimates are used to evaluate how important moral hazard and job experience are in jointly determining promotion rates, turnover and compensation.

Suggested Citation

  • George-Levi Gayle & Limor Golan & Robert A. Miller, 2009. "Promotion, Turnover and Compensation in the Executive Market," 2009 Meeting Papers 118, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed009:118
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Fudenberg, Drew & Holmstrom, Bengt & Milgrom, Paul, 1990. "Short-term contracts and long-term agency relationships," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 51(1), pages 1-31, June.
    2. Patrick Bajari & Han Hong & Ahmed Khwaja, 2006. "Moral Hazard, Adverse Selection and Health Expenditures: A Semiparametric Analysis," NBER Working Papers 12445, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Canice Prendergast, 1999. "The Provision of Incentives in Firms," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(1), pages 7-63, March.
    4. Dubois, Pierre & Vukina, Tomislav, 2009. "Optimal incentives under moral hazard and heterogeneous agents: Evidence from production contracts data," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 489-500, July.
    5. Christopher Ferrall & Bruce Shearer, 1999. "Incentives and Transactions Costs Within the Firm: Estimating an Agency Model Using Payroll Records," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 66(2), pages 309-338.
    6. Masson, Robert Tempest, 1971. "Executive Motivations, Earnings, and Consequent Equity Performance," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 79(6), pages 1278-1292, Nov.-Dec..
    7. George-Levi Gayle & Robert A. Miller, 2009. "Has Moral Hazard Become a More Important Factor in Managerial Compensation?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(5), pages 1740-1769, December.
    8. Gibbons, Robert & Murphy, Kevin J, 1992. "Optimal Incentive Contracts in the Presence of Career Concerns: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(3), pages 468-505, June.
    9. Margiotta, Mary M & Miller, Robert A, 2000. "Managerial Compensation and the Cost of Moral Hazard," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 41(3), pages 669-719, August.
    10. Brian J. Hall & Jeffrey B. Liebman, 1998. "Are CEOs Really Paid Like Bureaucrats?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 113(3), pages 653-691.
    11. McCue, Kristin, 1996. "Promotions and Wage Growth," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 14(2), pages 175-209, April.
    12. Gibbons, Robert & Waldman, Michael, 1999. "Careers in organizations: Theory and evidence," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 36, pages 2373-2437 Elsevier.
    13. Robert A. Miller & Carnegie Mellon University & George-Levi Gayle, 2008. "Identifying and testing testing generalized models of moral hazard of managerial compensation," 2008 Meeting Papers 740, Society for Economic Dynamics.
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    Cited by:

    1. George-Levi Gayle & Limor Golan & Robert A. Miller, 2012. "Gender Differences in Executive Compensation and Job Mobility," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 30(4), pages 829-872.
    2. Francesco Lippi & Fabiano Schivardi, 2014. "Corporate control and executive selection," Quantitative Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 5, pages 417-456, July.
    3. Alex Edmans & Xavier Gabaix, 2016. "Executive Compensation: A Modern Primer," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, pages 1232-1287.
    4. Seungjin Han, 2016. "Pre-CEO Executive Skill Accumulation and Firm-CEO Matching with Pay Limits," Department of Economics Working Papers 2016-04, McMaster University.
    5. Daniel F. Garrett & Alessandro Pavan, 2012. "Managerial Turnover in a Changing World," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 120(5), pages 879-925.
    6. Gayle, George-Levi & Golan, Limor & Miller, Robert A., 2015. "Interlocked Executives and Insider Board Members: An Empirical Analysis," Working Papers 2015-40, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    7. repec:oup:rcorpf:v:4:y:2015:i:1:p:43-68. is not listed on IDEAS

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