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Dynamic Status Effects, Savings, and Income Inequality

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  • Dioikitopoulos, Evangelos
  • Turnovsky, Stephen
  • Wendner, Ronald

Abstract

This paper advances the hypothesis that the intensity of status preferences depends negatively on the average wealth of society (endogenous dynamic status effect), in accordance with empirical evidence. Our theory replicates the contradictory historical facts of an increasing saving rate along with declining returns to capital over time. By affecting the dynamics of the saving rate, the dynamic status effect raises inequality, thereby providing a behavioural mechanism for the observed diverse dynamics of income inequality across countries. In countries in which the dynamic status effect is strong (weak) inequality rises (declines) over time in response to a positive productivity shock.

Suggested Citation

  • Dioikitopoulos, Evangelos & Turnovsky, Stephen & Wendner, Ronald, 2017. "Dynamic Status Effects, Savings, and Income Inequality," MPRA Paper 81005, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:81005
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    Cited by:

    1. Herold, Florian & Kuzmics, Christoph, 2016. "The evolution of taking roles," BERG Working Paper Series 115, Bamberg University, Bamberg Economic Research Group.
    2. Christoph Zwick, 2018. "On the origin of current account deficits in the Euro area periphery: A DSGE perspective," Graz Economics Papers 2018-02, University of Graz, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Status preferences; saving rate; growth; inequality;

    JEL classification:

    • D11 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Theory
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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