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Veblen’s Theory of the Leisure Class Revisited: Implications for Optimal Income Taxation

Listed author(s):
  • Aronsson, Thomas

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Umeå University)

  • Johansson-Stenman, Olof

    ()

    (Department of Economics)

Almost all previous studies on public policy under relative consumption concerns have ignored the role of leisure for status comparisons. Inspired by Veblen (1899), this paper considers a two-type optimal income tax model, where people care about their relative consumption, and where the importance of relative consumption increases with the use of leisure due to increased consumption visibility. We show that increased consumption positionality typically implies higher marginal income tax rates for both ability-types. Using a leisure-weighted measure of reference consumption, rather than a measure where leisure plays no role as in the previous literature, increases the marginal income tax rate implemented for the low-ability type and decreases the marginal income tax rate implemented for the high-ability type, i.e., it gives rise to a regressive tax component.

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Paper provided by Umeå University, Department of Economics in its series Umeå Economic Studies with number 812.

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Length: 29 pages
Date of creation: 25 Aug 2010
Handle: RePEc:hhs:umnees:0812
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Department of Economics, Umeå University, S-901 87 Umeå, Sweden

Phone: 090 - 786 61 42
Fax: 090 - 77 23 02
Web page: http://www.econ.umu.se/
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