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Analysis OF Energy Efficiency Practices of SMEs in Ghana: An application of Product Generational Dematerialisation

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  • Ackah, Ishmael

Abstract

Reducing the amount of energy used in producing a given output is a cost-effective way of tackling global warming. In addition, energy efficiency promotes energy security and saves cost. This study is structured in three parts. First, the energy efficiency practices of small and medium scale enterprises in rural Ghana are investigated. Second, the study applies the Product Generational Dematerialisation method to examine the energy efficiency consumption of electricity and fossil fuels in Ghana. Finally, the general unrestricted model (GUM) is applied to energy consumption in Ghana. The results reveal that reduction in energy consumption among SMEs can be attributed mostly to blackouts and not efficiency as indicated by 72% of the respondents. Further, all three models confirmed that the consumption of energy has not been efficient. Further, productivity was found to be a major driver of energy efficiency. The study recommends public education and the use of new appliances (‘not second hand’) to save energy.

Suggested Citation

  • Ackah, Ishmael, 2017. "Analysis OF Energy Efficiency Practices of SMEs in Ghana: An application of Product Generational Dematerialisation," MPRA Paper 77484, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:77484
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/77484/1/MPRA_paper_77484.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Energy Efficiency; Energy Consumption; Ghana; Product Generational Dematerialization; SMEs;

    JEL classification:

    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q21 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q28 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Government Policy
    • Q4 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy
    • Q41 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Demand and Supply; Prices

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