IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/pra/mprapa/57512.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Une théorie des relations sociales emploi et inégalité
[A theory of social relations jobs and inequality]

Author

Listed:
  • Jellal, Mohamed

Abstract

In this paper, we consider a simple model that integrates the component of the social network as a research method of workers as well as a method of recruitment policy by firms. Indeed, taking into account the social sphere is fundamental to understand the labor market dynamic in developing countries. In particular, our dynamic model shows that when the cost of formal recruitment policy are very high then only individuals who have more effective social network find a job which creates social inequality and its reproduction. Indeed, in the context of social relations, firms use the density of the social network as a more efficient informal employment allocation mechanism. In terms of public policy, it would be socially desirable to subsidize the costs of formal recruitment policy to reduce the persistence of social inequality. Our theory applies to the problem of gender gap as well as employment of migrants

Suggested Citation

  • Jellal, Mohamed, 2014. "Une théorie des relations sociales emploi et inégalité
    [A theory of social relations jobs and inequality]
    ," MPRA Paper 57512, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:57512
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/57512/1/MPRA_paper_57512.pdf
    File Function: original version
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Fontaine, François, 2008. "Why are similar workers paid differently? the role of social networks," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(12), pages 3960-3977, December.
    2. Jellal, Mohamed & Zenou, Yves, 2000. "A dynamic efficiency wage model with learning by doing," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 66(1), pages 99-105, January.
    3. Kugler, Adriana D., 2003. "Employee referrals and efficiency wages," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(5), pages 531-556, October.
    4. Antoni Calvó-Armengol & Matthew O. Jackson, 2004. "The Effects of Social Networks on Employment and Inequality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(3), pages 426-454, June.
    5. Linda Datcher Loury, 2004. "Some Job Contacts are More Equal Than Others: Earnings and Job Information Networks," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0404, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
    6. Pierre Cahuc & François Fontaine, 2004. "Le rôle des allocations chômage en présence de différentes méthodes de recherche d'emploi," Revue économique, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 55(3), pages 591-600.
    7. Montgomery, James D, 1991. "Social Networks and Labor-Market Outcomes: Toward an Economic Analysis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(5), pages 1407-1418, December.
    8. Linda Datcher Loury, 2004. "Job Tenure and Personal Contacts: Good Matches or Limited Choices?," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0417, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
    9. Jellal, Mohamed & Zenou, Yves, 1999. "Efficiency wages and the quality of job matching," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 201-217, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Social Networking; Job Search; Gender; Migrants; Dynamic Model; Recruitment Policy; Public Policy;

    JEL classification:

    • A13 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Relation of Economics to Social Values
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:57512. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Joachim Winter). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/vfmunde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.