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Energy-growth nexus and energy demand in Ghana: A review of empirical studies

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  • Kwakwa, Paul Adjei

Abstract

The paper reviews and assesses empirical studies on the causal relationship between energy and growth, and energy demand in Ghana over the years. It is found through the review that studies have not reached a consensus on the direction of causality between energy and growth, an outcome which could be attributed to the differences in the period for study, source of data and estimation methods. Generally, socioeconomic factors particularly affect demand for energy at the micro level, while the level of industrialization, urbanization, policy regime and industrial efficiency have been identified to influence demand for energy at the macro level. For policy purposes, other areas like intensity of energy use, conservation behavior and willingness to pay for energy services need to be researched into.

Suggested Citation

  • Kwakwa, Paul Adjei, 2014. "Energy-growth nexus and energy demand in Ghana: A review of empirical studies," MPRA Paper 54971, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 Apr 2014.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:54971
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Energy consumption; Economic growth; Households; Granger causality; Ghana;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • O4 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity

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