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Disaggregated Energy Consumption and Economic Growth in Ghana

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  • Paul Adjei Kwakwa

    (Department of Business Economics, Presbyterian University College, Ghana)

Abstract

This study has examined the causality between disaggregated energy consumption (electricity and fossil consumption) and overall growth, agricultural and manufacturing growth in Ghana’s economy over the period 1971-2007. By employing the Augmented Dickey Fuller test all variables were found to be integrated of the order one and the Johansen test showed the presence of cointegration between the variables. The granger causality test for the study indicated a unidirectional causality from overall growth to electricity and fossil consumption; a unidirectional causality from agriculture to electricity consumption both in the short and long run; and a feedback relationship between manufacturing and electricity consumption. Energy seem not be an essential factor of production in the agricultural sector but important in the manufacturing sector therefore, it is recommended that efforts be geared towards ensuring a high supply of energy to the manufacturing sector in order to keep up its contribution to the economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul Adjei Kwakwa, 2012. "Disaggregated Energy Consumption and Economic Growth in Ghana," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 2(1), pages 34-40.
  • Handle: RePEc:eco:journ2:2012-01-4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Strike Mbulawa, 2017. "The Impact Of Economic Infrastructure On Long Term Economic Growth In Botswana," Journal of Smart Economic Growth, , vol. 2(1), pages 15-33, March.
    2. Nicholas Apergisu & Dan Danuletiu, 2012. "Energy Consumption and Growth in Romania: Evidence from a Panel Error Correction Model," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 2(4), pages 348-356.
    3. Kais Saidi & Sami Hammami, 2016. "Economic growth, energy consumption and carbone dioxide emissions: recent evidence from panel data analysis for 58 countries," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 50(1), pages 361-383, January.
    4. Paul Adjei Kwakwa & Solomon Aboagye, 2014. "Energy consumption in Ghana and the story of economic growth, industrialization, trade openness and urbanization," Asian Bulletin of Energy Economics and Technology, Asian Online Journal Publishing Group, vol. 1(1), pages 1-6.
    5. Ishmael Ackah & Mcomari Asomani, 2015. "Empirical Analysis of Renewable Energy Demand in Ghana with Autometrics," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 5(3), pages 754-758.
    6. Ahmad, Ashfaq & Zhao, Yuhuan & Shahbaz, Muhammad & Bano, Sadia & Zhang, Zhonghua & Wang, Song & Liu, Ya, 2016. "Carbon emissions, energy consumption and economic growth: An aggregate and disaggregate analysis of the Indian economy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 131-143.
    7. Adom, Philip K. & Kwakwa, Paul Adjei, 2014. "Effects of changing trade structure and technical characteristics of the manufacturing sector on energy intensity in Ghana," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 475-483.
    8. Anthony N. Rezitis & Shaikh Mostak Ahammad, 2015. "The Relationship between Energy Consumption and Economic Growth in South and Southeast Asian Countries: A Panel Vector Autoregression Approach and Causality Analysis," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 5(3), pages 704-715.
    9. Kais Saidi & Sami Hammami, 2016. "Economic growth, energy consumption and carbone dioxide emissions: recent evidence from panel data analysis for 58 countries," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 50(1), pages 361-383, January.
    10. JacobPegou, Sibe. & Cesaire, Chiatchoua., 2015. "The Nexus Between Energy Consumption and Economic Growth: the Case of México," Panorama Económico, Escuela Superior de Economía, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, vol. 0(20), pages 129-156, primer se.
    11. Muhammad, Shahbaz, 2011. "Electricity Consumption, Financial Development and Economic Growth Nexus: A Revisit Study of Their Causality in Pakistan," MPRA Paper 35588, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 27 Dec 2011.
    12. Adom, Philip Kofi & Bekoe, William, 2013. "Modelling electricity demand in Ghana revisited: The role of policy regime changes," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 42-50.
    13. Ishmael Ackah & Frank Adu & Richard Opoku Takyi, 2014. "On The Demand Dynamics of Electricity in Ghana: Do Exogenous Non-Economic Variables Count?," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 4(2), pages 149-153.
    14. repec:bap:journl:170401 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Muhammad Shahbaz & Ijaz Ur Rehman & Rashid Sbia & Helmi Hamdi, 2016. "The Role of Information Communication Technology and Economic Growth in Recent Electricity Demand: Fresh Evidence from Combine Cointegration Approach in UAE," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 7(3), pages 797-818, September.
    16. Solarin, Sakiru Adebola & Shahbaz, Muhammad, 2013. "Trivariate causality between economic growth, urbanisation and electricity consumption in Angola: Cointegration and causality analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 876-884.
    17. Adom, Philip Kofi & Bekoe, William, 2012. "Conditional dynamic forecast of electrical energy consumption requirements in Ghana by 2020: A comparison of ARDL and PAM," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 367-380.
    18. Kwakwa, Paul Adjei & Alhassan, Hamdiyah & Adu, George, 2018. "Effect of natural resources extraction on energy consumption and carbon dioxide emission in Ghana," MPRA Paper 85401, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Energy consumption; Economic growth; Cointegration; Granger causality; Ghana;

    JEL classification:

    • C3 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables
    • O4 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity
    • Q43 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy and the Macroeconomy

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