IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/energy/v203y2020ics036054422030935x.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Energy substitution and technology costs in a transitional economy

Author

Listed:
  • Wesseh, Presley K.
  • Lin, Boqiang

Abstract

Traditional wisdom suggests that fossil-dominated energy mix is problematic to sustainable development. Like many countries, the Egyptian government has set ambitious targets for a possible transition towards renewable energy sources. In this study, a production model is adopted to examine the feasibility of energy substitution in Egypt and subsequently quantify the emissions reduction potential that arises from such a conversion. First, results suggest that renewable energy currently has no significant impact on economic growth in Egypt. However, it has the potential to contribute a 5% growth share if capital investment is at least doubled beyond current levels. Second, while energy substitution is possible from a technological standpoint, economically, inter-fuel substitution is limited in practice due to higher costs associated with renewable power generation technologies. This is further confirmed by the two investment scenarios which point to evidence of marginal reductions in nonrenewable energy (between 0.08% and 0.13%) and CO2 emissions when energy substitution is carried out. In general, these findings have implications for economic growth, renewable energy expansion, and CO2 emissions not only in Egypt but other developing countries as well.

Suggested Citation

  • Wesseh, Presley K. & Lin, Boqiang, 2020. "Energy substitution and technology costs in a transitional economy," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 203(C).
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:energy:v:203:y:2020:i:c:s036054422030935x
    DOI: 10.1016/j.energy.2020.117828
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S036054422030935X
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.1016/j.energy.2020.117828?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Yildirim, Ertuğrul & Saraç, Şenay & Aslan, Alper, 2012. "Energy consumption and economic growth in the USA: Evidence from renewable energy," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 16(9), pages 6770-6774.
    2. Muhammad Shahbaz & Ilhan Ozturk & Amjad Ali, 2015. "Electricity Consumption and Economic Growth Causality Revisited: Evidence from Turkey," Bulletin of Energy Economics (BEE), The Economics and Social Development Organization (TESDO), vol. 3(4), pages 176-193, December.
    3. Yuan, Jia-Hai & Kang, Jian-Gang & Zhao, Chang-Hong & Hu, Zhao-Guang, 2008. "Energy consumption and economic growth: Evidence from China at both aggregated and disaggregated levels," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 3077-3094, November.
    4. Chor Foon Tang, 2009. "Electricity consumption, income, foreign direct investment, and population in Malaysia: New evidence from multivariate framework analysis," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 36(4), pages 371-382, September.
    5. Wolde-Rufael, Yemane, 2009. "Energy consumption and economic growth: The experience of African countries revisited," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 217-224.
    6. Shiu, Alice & Lam, Pun-Lee, 2004. "Electricity consumption and economic growth in China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 47-54, January.
    7. Omri, Anis, 2014. "An international literature survey on energy-economic growth nexus: Evidence from country-specific studies," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 951-959.
    8. Wolde-Rufael, Yemane, 2006. "Electricity consumption and economic growth: a time series experience for 17 African countries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(10), pages 1106-1114, July.
    9. Bélaïd, Fateh & Abderrahmani, Fares, 2013. "Electricity consumption and economic growth in Algeria: A multivariate causality analysis in the presence of structural change," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 286-295.
    10. Payne, James E., 2009. "On the dynamics of energy consumption and output in the US," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 86(4), pages 575-577, April.
    11. Thompson, Henry, 2006. "The applied theory of energy substitution in production," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 410-425, July.
    12. Zhang, Xing-Ping & Cheng, Xiao-Mei, 2009. "Energy consumption, carbon emissions, and economic growth in China," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(10), pages 2706-2712, August.
    13. Hu, Jin-Li & Lin, Cheng-Hsun, 2008. "Disaggregated energy consumption and GDP in Taiwan: A threshold co-integration analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 2342-2358, September.
    14. Kahsai, Mulugeta S. & Nondo, Chali & Schaeffer, Peter V. & Gebremedhin, Tesfa G., 2012. "Income level and the energy consumption–GDP nexus: Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 739-746.
    15. Jahangir Alam, Mohammad & Ara Begum, Ismat & Buysse, Jeroen & Van Huylenbroeck, Guido, 2012. "Energy consumption, carbon emissions and economic growth nexus in Bangladesh: Cointegration and dynamic causality analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 217-225.
    16. Ebohon, Obas John, 1996. "Energy, economic growth and causality in developing countries : A case study of Tanzania and Nigeria," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(5), pages 447-453, May.
    17. Kebede, Ellene & Kagochi, John & Jolly, Curtis M., 2010. "Energy consumption and economic development in Sub-Sahara Africa," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 532-537, May.
    18. Wolde-Rufael, Yemane, 2005. "Energy demand and economic growth: The African experience," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 27(8), pages 891-903, November.
    19. Eggoh, Jude C. & Bangake, Chrysost & Rault, Christophe, 2011. "Energy consumption and economic growth revisited in African countries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(11), pages 7408-7421.
    20. repec:cii:cepiei:2012-q1-129-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    21. Halicioglu, Ferda, 2007. "Residential electricity demand dynamics in Turkey," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 199-210, March.
    22. Shahbaz, Muhammad & Lean, Hooi Hooi, 2012. "The dynamics of electricity consumption and economic growth: A revisit study of their causality in Pakistan," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 146-153.
    23. Al-mulali, Usama & Binti Che Sab, Che Normee, 2012. "The impact of energy consumption and CO2 emission on the economic growth and financial development in the Sub Saharan African countries," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 180-186.
    24. Ramcharran, Harridutt, 1990. "Electricity consumption and economic growth in Jamaica," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 65-70, January.
    25. Esso, Loesse Jacques, 2010. "Threshold cointegration and causality relationship between energy use and growth in seven African countries," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 1383-1391, November.
    26. Muhammad Shahbaz & Mete Feridun, 2012. "Electricity consumption and economic growth empirical evidence from Pakistan," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 46(5), pages 1583-1599, August.
    27. Ho, Chun-Yu & Siu, Kam Wing, 2007. "A dynamic equilibrium of electricity consumption and GDP in Hong Kong: An empirical investigation," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 2507-2513, April.
    28. Wesseh, Presley K. & Lin, Boqiang, 2018. "Energy consumption, fuel substitution, technical change, and economic growth: Implications for CO2 mitigation in Egypt," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 340-347.
    29. Narayan, Paresh Kumar & Smyth, Russell, 2005. "Electricity consumption, employment and real income in Australia evidence from multivariate Granger causality tests," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(9), pages 1109-1116, June.
    30. Jumbe, Charles B. L., 2004. "Cointegration and causality between electricity consumption and GDP: empirical evidence from Malawi," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 61-68, January.
    31. Yoo, Seung-Hoon & Kim, Yeonbae, 2006. "Electricity generation and economic growth in Indonesia," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 31(14), pages 2890-2899.
    32. Wolde-Rufael, Yemane, 2010. "Bounds test approach to cointegration and causality between nuclear energy consumption and economic growth in India," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 52-58, January.
    33. Wesseh, Presley K. & Zoumara, Babette, 2012. "Causal independence between energy consumption and economic growth in Liberia: Evidence from a non-parametric bootstrapped causality test," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 518-527.
    34. Menyah, Kojo & Wolde-Rufael, Yemane, 2010. "CO2 emissions, nuclear energy, renewable energy and economic growth in the US," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 2911-2915, June.
    35. Kumar, Ronald Ravinesh & Kumar, Radika, 2013. "Effects of energy consumption on per worker output: A study of Kenya and South Africa," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 1187-1193.
    36. Ouédraogo, Idrissa M., 2010. "Electricity consumption and economic growth in Burkina Faso: A cointegration analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 524-531, May.
    37. Yuan, Jiahai & Zhao, Changhong & Yu, Shunkun & Hu, Zhaoguang, 2007. "Electricity consumption and economic growth in China: Cointegration and co-feature analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 1179-1191, November.
    38. Tamba, Jean Gaston & Njomo, Donatien & Limanond, Thirayoot & Ntsafack, Borel, 2012. "Causality analysis of diesel consumption and economic growth in Cameroon," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 567-575.
    39. Frondel, Manuel, 2011. "Modelling energy and non-energy substitution: A brief survey of elasticities," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(8), pages 4601-4604, August.
    40. Akinlo, A.E., 2008. "Energy consumption and economic growth: Evidence from 11 Sub-Sahara African countries," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 2391-2400, September.
    41. Lin, Boqiang & Ankrah, Isaac, 2019. "On Nigeria's renewable energy program: Examining the effectiveness, substitution potential, and the impact on national output," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 167(C), pages 1181-1193.
    42. Lin, Boqiang & Wesseh Jr., Presley K., 2014. "Energy consumption and economic growth in South Africa reexamined: A nonparametric testing apporach," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 840-850.
    43. Menyah, Kojo & Wolde-Rufael, Yemane, 2010. "Energy consumption, pollutant emissions and economic growth in South Africa," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 1374-1382, November.
    44. Chandran, V.G.R. & Sharma, Susan & Madhavan, Karunagaran, 2010. "Electricity consumption-growth nexus: The case of Malaysia," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 606-612, January.
    45. Abosedra, Salah & Dah, Abdallah & Ghosh, Sajal, 2009. "Electricity consumption and economic growth, the case of Lebanon," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 86(4), pages 429-432, April.
    46. Yoo, Seung-Hoon, 2005. "Electricity consumption and economic growth: evidence from Korea," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(12), pages 1627-1632, August.
    47. Odhiambo, Nicholas M., 2009. "Electricity consumption and economic growth in South Africa: A trivariate causality test," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 635-640, September.
    48. Odhiambo, Nicholas M., 2010. "Energy consumption, prices and economic growth in three SSA countries: A comparative study," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(5), pages 2463-2469, May.
    49. Fuinhas, José Alberto & Marques, António Cardoso, 2013. "Rentierism, energy and economic growth: The case of Algeria and Egypt (1965–2010)," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 1165-1171.
    50. Zachariadis, Theodoros & Pashourtidou, Nicoletta, 2007. "An empirical analysis of electricity consumption in Cyprus," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 183-198, March.
    51. Olayeni Olaolu Richard, 2012. "Energy consumption and economic growth in sub-Saharan Africa: An asymmetric cointegration analysis," International Economics, CEPII research center, issue 129, pages 99-118.
    52. Lin, Boqiang & Xie, Chunping, 2014. "Energy substitution effect on transport industry of China-based on trans-log production function," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 213-222.
    53. Altinay, Galip & Karagol, Erdal, 2004. "Structural break, unit root, and the causality between energy consumption and GDP in Turkey," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 985-994, November.
    54. Solarin, Sakiru Adebola & Shahbaz, Muhammad, 2013. "Trivariate causality between economic growth, urbanisation and electricity consumption in Angola: Cointegration and causality analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 876-884.
    55. Odhiambo, Nicholas M., 2009. "Energy consumption and economic growth nexus in Tanzania: An ARDL bounds testing approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 617-622, February.
    56. Akinlo, A.E., 2009. "Electricity consumption and economic growth in Nigeria: Evidence from cointegration and co-feature analysis," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 681-693, September.
    57. Ghosh, Sajal, 2002. "Electricity consumption and economic growth in India," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 125-129, January.
    58. Sari, Ramazan & Ewing, Bradley T. & Soytas, Ugur, 2008. "The relationship between disaggregate energy consumption and industrial production in the United States: An ARDL approach," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 2302-2313, September.
    59. Lorde, Troy & Waithe, Kimberly & Francis, Brian, 2010. "The importance of electrical energy for economic growth in Barbados," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 1411-1420, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Fei, Rilong & Wang, Haolin & Wen, Zihao & Yuan, Zhen & Yuan, Kaihua & Chunga, Joseph, 2021. "Tracking factor substitution and the rebound effect of China’s agricultural energy consumption: A new research perspective from asymmetric response," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 216(C).
    2. Jabeen, Gul & Ahmad, Munir & Zhang, Qingyu, 2021. "Perceived critical factors affecting consumers’ intention to purchase renewable generation technologies: Rural-urban heterogeneity," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 218(C).

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Wesseh, Presley K. & Lin, Boqiang, 2016. "Can African countries efficiently build their economies on renewable energy?," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 161-173.
    2. Wesseh, Presley K. & Lin, Boqiang, 2016. "Factor demand, technical change and inter-fuel substitution in Africa," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 979-991.
    3. Wesseh, Presley K. & Lin, Boqiang, 2016. "Output and substitution elasticities of energy and implications for renewable energy expansion in the ECOWAS region," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 125-137.
    4. Lin, Boqiang & Ankrah, Isaac, 2019. "On Nigeria's renewable energy program: Examining the effectiveness, substitution potential, and the impact on national output," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 167(C), pages 1181-1193.
    5. Sofien, Tiba & Omri, Anis, 2016. "Literature survey on the relationships between energy variables, environment and economic growth," MPRA Paper 82555, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 14 Sep 2016.
    6. Omri, Anis, 2014. "An international literature survey on energy-economic growth nexus: Evidence from country-specific studies," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 951-959.
    7. Tiba, Sofien & Omri, Anis, 2017. "Literature survey on the relationships between energy, environment and economic growth," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 1129-1146.
    8. Wesseh, Presley K. & Lin, Boqiang, 2017. "Is renewable energy a model for powering Eastern African countries transition to industrialization and urbanization?," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 909-917.
    9. Ozturk, Ilhan, 2010. "A literature survey on energy-growth nexus," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 340-349, January.
    10. Kouakou, Auguste K., 2011. "Economic growth and electricity consumption in Cote d'Ivoire: Evidence from time series analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 3638-3644, June.
    11. Michael McAleer & Ha Minh Nguyen & Ngoc Hoang Bui & Duc Hong Vo, 2019. "Energy Consumption and Economic Growth: Evidence from Vietnam," Journal of Reviews on Global Economics, Lifescience Global, vol. 8, pages 350-361.
    12. Dakpogan, Arnaud & Smit, Eon, 2018. "The effect of electricity losses on GDP in Benin," MPRA Paper 89545, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Solarin, Sakiru Adebola & Shahbaz, Muhammad, 2013. "Trivariate causality between economic growth, urbanisation and electricity consumption in Angola: Cointegration and causality analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 876-884.
    14. Lin, Boqiang & Atsagli, Philip, 2017. "Energy consumption, inter-fuel substitution and economic growth in Nigeria," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 120(C), pages 675-685.
    15. Tang, Chor Foon & Shahbaz, Muhammad & Arouri, Mohamed, 2013. "Re-investigating the electricity consumption and economic growth nexus in Portugal," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 1515-1524.
    16. Muhammad Shahbaz & Mete Feridun, 2012. "Electricity consumption and economic growth empirical evidence from Pakistan," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 46(5), pages 1583-1599, August.
    17. Wesseh, Presley K. & Lin, Boqiang, 2018. "Energy consumption, fuel substitution, technical change, and economic growth: Implications for CO2 mitigation in Egypt," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 340-347.
    18. Shahbaz, Muhammad & Lean, Hooi Hooi, 2012. "The dynamics of electricity consumption and economic growth: A revisit study of their causality in Pakistan," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 146-153.
    19. Lin, Boqiang & Abudu, Hermas, 2019. "Changes in Energy Intensity During the development Process:Evidence in Sub-Saharan Africa and Policy Implications," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 183(C), pages 1012-1022.
    20. Hamdi, Helmi & Sbia, Rashid & Shahbaz, Muhammad, 2014. "The nexus between electricity consumption and economic growth in Bahrain," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 227-237.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:energy:v:203:y:2020:i:c:s036054422030935x. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: http://www.journals.elsevier.com/energy .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Catherine Liu (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www.journals.elsevier.com/energy .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.