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The global financial crisis: An analysis of the spillover effects on African stock markets

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  • Sugimoto, Kimiko
  • Matsuki, Takashi
  • Yoshida, Yushi

Abstract

This paper examines the relative importance of the global and regional markets for financial markets in developing countries, particularly during the US financial crisis and the European sovereign debt crisis. We examine the way in which the degree of regional (seven African markets combined), global (China, France, Germany, Japan, the UK and the US), commodity (gold and petroleum), and nominal effective exchange rate (Euro and US dollar) spillovers to individual African countries evolve during the two crises through the econometric method introduced by Diebold and Yilmaz (2012). We find that African markets are most severely affected by spillovers from global markets and modestly from commodity and currency markets. Conversely, the regional spillovers within Africa are smaller than the global ones and are insulated from the global crises. We also find that the aggregated spillover effects of European countries to the African markets exceeded that of the US even at the wake of the US financial crisis.

Suggested Citation

  • Sugimoto, Kimiko & Matsuki, Takashi & Yoshida, Yushi, 2013. "The global financial crisis: An analysis of the spillover effects on African stock markets," MPRA Paper 50473, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:50473
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    1. repec:eee:intfin:v:50:y:2017:i:c:p:135-155 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Ahmed El Ghini & Youssef Saidi, 2017. "Return and volatility spillovers in the Moroccan stock market during the financial crisis," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 52(4), pages 1481-1504, June.
    3. Boamah, Nicholas Addai & Loudon, Geoffrey & Watts, Edward J., 2017. "Structural breaks in the relative importance of country and industry factors in African stock returns," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 79-88.
    4. Afees A. Salisu & Kazeem Isah, 2017. "Modeling the spillovers between stock market and money market in Nigeria," Working Papers 023, Centre for Econometric and Allied Research, University of Ibadan.
    5. repec:eee:quaeco:v:65:y:2017:i:c:p:88-96 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Tabak, Benjamin M. & de Castro Miranda, Rodrigo & da Silva Medeiros, Maurício, 2016. "Contagion in CDS, banking and equity markets," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 120-134.
    7. repec:eee:jebusi:v:92:y:2017:i:c:p:29-44 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Gannon, Gerard L. & Thuraisamy, Kannan S., 2017. "Sovereign risk and the impact of crisis: Evidence from Latin AmericaAuthor-Name: Batten, Jonathan A," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 328-350.
    9. Hou, Yang & Li, Steven, 2016. "Information transmission between U.S. and China index futures markets: An asymmetric DCC GARCH approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 52(PB), pages 884-897.
    10. Kutan, Ali M. & Muradoğlu, Yaz G., 2016. "Financial and real sector returns, IMF-related news, and the Asian crisis," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 16(C), pages 28-37.
    11. Boamah, Nicholas Addai, 2017. "The dynamics of the relative global sector effects and contagion in emerging markets equity returns," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 39(PA), pages 433-453.
    12. Liow, Kim Hiang & Newell, Graeme, 2016. "Real estate global beta and spillovers: An international study," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 297-313.
    13. Majapa, Mohamed & Gossel, Sean Joss, 2016. "Topology of the South African stock market network across the 2008 financial crisis," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 445(C), pages 35-47.
    14. Gourène, Grakolet Arnold Zamereith & Mendy, Pierre & Ake N'gbo, Gilbert Marie, 2017. "Multiple time-xcales analysis of global stock markets spillovers effects in African stock markets," MPRA Paper 77632, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Kübra Akca & Serda Selin Ozturk, 2016. "The Effect of 2008 Crisis on the Volatility Spillovers among Six Major Markets," International Review of Finance, International Review of Finance Ltd., vol. 16(1), pages 169-178, March.
    16. Jiang, Junhua, 2017. "Discount rate or cash flow contagion? Evidence from the recent financial crises," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 39(PA), pages 315-326.
    17. repec:eee:riibaf:v:41:y:2017:i:c:p:600-612 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    African financial market; financial crisis; financial integration; spillover; variance decomposition.;

    JEL classification:

    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa

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