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The role of social trust in reducing long-term truancy and forming human capital in Japan

  • Yamamura, Eiji

This paper attempts to examine how social trust influences human capital formation using prefectural level data in Japan. To this end, I constructed a proxy for social trust, based on the Japanese General Social Surveys. After controlling for socioeconomic factors, I found that social trust plays an important role in reducing the rate of long-term truancy in primary and junior high school. Results suggest that social trust improves educational quality and plays a critical role in human capital formation in developed countries.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/23759/1/MPRA_paper_23759.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 23759.

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Date of creation: 30 Jun 2010
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:23759
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  1. Marcel Fafchamps, 2002. "Returns to social network capital among traders," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 54(2), pages 173-206, April.
  2. Andrew Leigh, 2006. "Does Equality Lead to Fraternity?," CEPR Discussion Papers 513, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  3. "Fukao, Kyoji" & "Yue, Ximing", 2000. "Regional Factor Inputs and Convergence in Japan―How Much Can We Apply Closed Economy Neoclassical Growth Models?―," Economic Review, Hitotsubashi University, vol. 51(2), pages 136-151, April.
  4. Joel Sobel, 2002. "Can We Trust Social Capital?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(1), pages 139-154, March.
  5. Zak, Paul J & Knack, Stephen, 2001. "Trust and Growth," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 111(470), pages 295-321, April.
  6. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2000. "The Colonial Origins of Comparative Development: An Empirical Investigation," NBER Working Papers 7771, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  9. Kurt Annen, 2001. "Inclusive and Exclusive Social Capital in the Small-Firm Sector in Developing Countries," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 157(2), pages 319-, June.
  10. Fabio Sabatini, 2009. "The relationship between trust and networks. An exploratory empirical analysis," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 29(2), pages 661-672.
  11. Jan Fidrmuc & Klarita Gerxhani, 2007. "Mind the Gap! Social Capital, East and West," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp888, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  12. Eiji Yamamura & Tetsushi Sonobe & Keijiro Otsuka, 2003. "Human capital, cluster formation, and international relocation: the case of the garment industry in Japan, 1968--98," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 3(1), pages 37-56, January.
  13. Bjornskov, Christian, 2006. "The multiple facets of social capital," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 22-40, March.
  14. Bjrnskov, Christian, 2009. "Social trust and the growth of schooling," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 249-257, April.
  15. Annen, Kurt, 2003. "Social capital, inclusive networks, and economic performance," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 50(4), pages 449-463, April.
  16. Huang, Jian & Maassen van den Brink, Henriëtte & Groot, Wim, 2009. "A meta-analysis of the effect of education on social capital," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 454-464, August.
  17. Marcel Fafchamps, 2005. "Development and Social Capital," Economics Series Working Papers GPRG-WPS-007, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  18. Papagapitos, Agapitos & Riley, Robert, 2009. "Social trust and human capital formation," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 102(3), pages 158-160, March.
  19. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Why Do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output per Worker than Others?," NBER Working Papers 6564, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  20. Joe Chen & Yun Jeong Choi & Yasuyuki Sawada, 2008. "How Is Suicide Different in Japan?," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-557, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
  21. Alesina, Alberto F & La Ferrara, Eliana, 2000. "Who Trusts Others?," CEPR Discussion Papers 2646, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  22. Edward L. Glaeser & Andrei Shleifer, 2001. "Legal Origins," NBER Working Papers 8272, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  23. Durlauf,S.N., 2001. "On the empirics of social capital," Working papers 3, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
  24. Eiji Yamamura, 2008. "Determinants of trust in a racially homogeneous society," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 26(1), pages 1-9.
  25. William Blankenau & Gabriele Camera, 2009. "Public Spending on Education and the Incentives for Student Achievement," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 76(303), pages 505-527, 07.
  26. Knack, Stephen & Keefer, Philip, 1997. "Does Social Capital Have an Economic Payoff? A Cross-Country Investigation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 112(4), pages 1251-88, November.
  27. Anderson, Joan B., 2008. "Social capital and student learning: Empirical results from Latin American primary schools," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 439-449, August.
  28. Marcel Fafchamps & Bart Minten, 2001. "Social Capital and Agricultural Trade," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(3), pages 680-685.
  29. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:26:y:2008:i:1:p:1-9 is not listed on IDEAS
  30. Yamamura, Eiji, 2010. "Public spending on education: Its impact on students skipping classes and completing school," MPRA Paper 23657, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  31. Eiji Yamamura, 2010. "The different impacts of socio-economic factors on suicide between males and females," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(10), pages 1009-1012.
  32. Edward Miguel & Paul Gertler & David I. Levine, 2005. "Does Social Capital Promote Industrialization? Evidence from a Rapid Industrializer," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(4), pages 754-762, November.
  33. Paldam, Martin, 2000. " Social Capital: One or Many? Definition and Measurement," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(5), pages 629-53, December.
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