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The different impacts of socio-economic factors on suicide between males and females

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  • Eiji Yamamura

Abstract

I used the national panel data of Japan to investigate the determinants of suicide. The major findings are twofold. First, the social capital that enhances community integration had a greater effect on the suicide of females than that of males. This is probably because females are less likely to have full-time jobs and thus have more spare time, leading them to seek social involvement in their neighbourhoods and participate in community activities. Second, divorce causes the propensity to commit suicide among males to become about two times higher than that among females because of the compensation costs that males are more likely to pay to females.

Suggested Citation

  • Eiji Yamamura, 2010. "The different impacts of socio-economic factors on suicide between males and females," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(10), pages 1009-1012.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:17:y:2010:i:10:p:1009-1012
    DOI: 10.1080/13504850802676199
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jungeilges, Jochen & Kirchgassner, Gebhard, 2002. "Economic welfare, civil liberty, and suicide: an empirical investigation," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 215-231.
    2. Matti Viren, 1996. "Suicide and business cycles: Finnish evidence," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(11), pages 737-738.
    3. Yang, Bijou & Stack, Steven & Lester, David, 1992. "Suicide and unemployment: Predicting the smoothed trend and yearly fluctuations," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 39-41.
    4. Hamermesh, Daniel S & Soss, Neal M, 1974. "An Economic Theory of Suicide," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(1), pages 83-98, Jan.-Feb..
    5. Dave E. Marcotte, 2003. "The Economics of Suicide, Revisited," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 69(3), pages 628-643, January.
    6. Chuanc, Hwei-Lin & Huang, Wei-Chiao, 1997. "Economic and social correlates of regional suicide rates: A pooled cross-section and time-series analysis," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 277-289.
    7. Yamamura, Eiji, 2008. "The role of social capital in homogeneous society: Review of recent researches in Japan," MPRA Paper 11385, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Eiji Yamamura, 2008. "Diffusion of home computers and social networks: a study using Japanese panel data," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(15), pages 1231-1235.
    9. Ryoichi Watanabe & Masakazu Furukawa & Ryota Nakamura & Yoshiaki Ogura, 2006. "Analysis of the Socioeconomic Difficulties Affecting the Suicide Rate in Japan," KIER Working Papers 626, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
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    JEL classification:

    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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