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Socio-economic effects on increased cinema attendance: The case of Japan


  • Yamamura, Eiji


Recently the Japanese film industry revived after a long period of decline. This has been accompanied by structural changes characterized by the present growth of multiplexes and consumer demand. This paper attempts to explore the recent revival process of the film industry in Japan using panel data of 47 prefectures from the period 1990-2001. I found, through fixed effects and Conditional Logit estimations, the following. First, decay of informal social networks is less likely to increase a film's attendance numbers, while multiplexes are more likely to increase those numbers. Second, new cinemas tend to be built in locations where the market is less competitive and are less inclined to be located in areas where informal social networks are weaker.

Suggested Citation

  • Yamamura, Eiji, 2008. "Socio-economic effects on increased cinema attendance: The case of Japan," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 2546-2555, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:37:y:2008:i:6:p:2546-2555

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Colin Camerer & Linda Babcock & George Loewenstein & Richard Thaler, 1997. "Labor Supply of New York City Cabdrivers: One Day at a Time," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(2), pages 407-441.
    2. Roberto A. Weber & Colin F. Camerer, 2003. "Cultural Conflict and Merger Failure: An Experimental Approach," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 49(4), pages 400-415, April.
    3. Charles F. Manski, 2004. "Measuring Expectations," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 72(5), pages 1329-1376, September.
    4. George A. Akerlof & Rachel E. Kranton, 2005. "Identity and the Economics of Organizations," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 19(1), pages 9-32, Winter.
    5. Mark Granovetter, 2005. "The Impact of Social Structure on Economic Outcomes," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 19(1), pages 33-50, Winter.
    6. Stratmann, Thomas, 1996. "Instability of Collective Decisions? Testing for Cyclical Majorities," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 88(1-2), pages 15-28, July.
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    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Jordi McKenzie, 2012. "The Economics Of Movies: A Literature Survey," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(1), pages 42-70, February.
    2. Yamamura, Eiji, 2013. "Externality of young children on parents’ watching of anime: Evidence from Japanese micro data," MPRA Paper 46878, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. repec:bla:ecinqu:v:55:y:2017:i:2:p:736-756 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Eiji Yamamura, 2014. "The effect of young children on their parents’ anime-viewing habits: evidence from Japanese microdata," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 38(4), pages 331-349, November.


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