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Determinants of Suicides in Denmark: Evidence from Time Series Data

  • Halicioglu, Ferda
  • Andrés, Antonio R.

This research examines empirically the determinants of suicides in Denmark over the period 1970-2006. To our knowledge, there exist no previous study that estimates a dynamic econometric model of suicides on the basis of time series data and cointegration framework at disaggregate level. Our results indicate that suicide is associated with a range of socio-economic factors but the strength of the association can differ by gender. In particular, we find that a rise in real per capita income and fertility rate decreases suicides for males and females. Divorce is positively associated with suicides and this effect seems to be stronger for men. A fall in unemployment rates seems to lower significantly suicides in males and females. Policy implications of suicides are discussed with some appropriate recommendations.

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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 24980.

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Date of creation: 2010
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:24980
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