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Trust and Fertility: Evidence from OECD countries

  • Yamamura, Eiji
  • Antonio R, Andrés

Using panel data for 24 (OECD) countries during the period 1980–2004 this study examines how social trust affects fertility. The major finding through the random effects approach is that the social trust increases the fertility rate. A 1% rise in the trust rate leads to an increase in fertility by 0.01 points. The results presented here suggest that in developed countries, trust underlies the desirable circumstances for child rearing.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/29978/1/MPRA_paper_29978.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 29978.

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Date of creation: 18 Mar 2011
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:29978
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  1. Galor, Oded & Weil, David N, 1996. "The Gender Gap, Fertility, and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(3), pages 374-87, June.
  2. Niclas Berggren & Henrik Jordahl, 2006. "Free to Trust: Economic Freedom and Social Capital," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 59(2), pages 141-169, 05.
  3. Zak, Paul J & Knack, Stephen, 2001. "Trust and Growth," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 111(470), pages 295-321, April.
  4. Robert J. Barro, 1989. "Economic Growth in a Cross Section of Countries," NBER Working Papers 3120, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Fabio Sabatini, 2009. "The relationship between trust and networks. An exploratory empirical analysis," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 29(2), pages 661-672.
  6. Joëlle Sleebos, 2003. "Low Fertility Rates in OECD Countries: Facts and Policy Responses," OECD Labour Market and Social Policy Occasional Papers 15, OECD Publishing.
  7. Andrew Leigh, 2006. "Does Equality Lead to Fraternity?," CEPR Discussion Papers 513, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  8. Dolores Ferrero Martínez & Amaia Iza, 2004. "Skill premium effects on fertility and female labor force supply," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 1-16, February.
  9. Betsey Stevenson, 2006. "The impact of divorce laws on marriage-specific capital," Working Paper Series 2006-43, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  10. Papagapitos, Agapitos & Riley, Robert, 2009. "Social trust and human capital formation," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 102(3), pages 158-160, March.
  11. Yamamura, Eiji, 2010. "The role of social trust in reducing long-term truancy and forming human capital in Japan," MPRA Paper 23759, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  12. Yamamura, Eiji, 2011. "The role of social trust in reducing long-term truancy and forming human capital in Japan," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 380-389, April.
  13. Patricia Apps & Ray Rees, 2004. "Fertility, Taxation and Family Policy," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 106(4), pages 745-763, December.
  14. Rafael La Porta & Florencio Lopez-de-Silane & Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1996. "Trust in Large Organizations," NBER Working Papers 5864, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Yamamura, Eiji, 2010. "The role of social trust in reducing long-term truancy and forming human capital in Japan," MPRA Paper 26407, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  16. Fabio Sabatini, 2008. "Social Capital and the Quality of Economic Development," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(3), pages 466-499, 08.
  17. Huang, J. & Maassen van den Brink, H. & Groot, W., 2009. "A Meta-Analysis of the Effect of Education on Social Capital," Working Papers 22, Top Institute for Evidence Based Education Research.
  18. Abul Masih & Rumi Masih, 2000. "The dynamics of fertility, family planning and female education in a developing economy," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(12), pages 1617-1627.
  19. Becker, Gary S & Landes, Elisabeth M & Michael, Robert T, 1977. "An Economic Analysis of Marital Instability," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 85(6), pages 1141-87, December.
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