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Student and teacher attendance: The role of shared goods in reducing absenteeism

  • Banerjee, Ritwik
  • King, Elizabeth M.
  • Orazem, Peter F.
  • Paterno, Elizabeth M.

A theoretical model is advanced that demonstrates that, if teacher and student attendance generate a shared good, then teacher and student attendance will be mutually reinforcing. Using data from the Northwest Frontier Province of Pakistan, empirical evidence supporting that proposition is advanced. Controlling for the endogeneity of teacher and student attendance, the most powerful factor raising teacher attendance is the attendance of the children in the school, and the most important factor influencing child attendance is the presence of the teacher. The results suggest that one important avenue to be explored in developing policies to reduce teacher absenteeism is to focus on raising the attendance of children.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics of Education Review.

Volume (Year): 31 (2012)
Issue (Month): 5 ()
Pages: 563-574

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:31:y:2012:i:5:p:563-574
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/econedurev

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