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The single global currency - common cents for the world (2008 Edition)


  • Bonpasse, Morrison


Abstract This is the 2008 Edition of one of only two book in print in the world about the Single Global Currency, and is the only book in the world priced in 141 currencies (down from 147 in the 2006 edition.).This number is significant, as it's the number of currencies required among the 192 U.N. members to conduct local business, including the payment of taxes. The book describes the origins of the current worldwide foreign exchange system, and tells how to change it; and save the world - trillions. The multicurrency foreign exchange trading system was developed about 2,500 years ago to enable people of different currency areas to trade. That system has become far more sophisticated in the meantime and handles $3.8 trillion per day; but it is very expensive and risky. It is now time to replace that system with a single global currency. In a 3-G world with a Single Global Currency managed by a Global Central Bank within a Global Monetary Union: - Annual transaction costs of $400 billion will be eliminated. - Worldwide asset values will increase by about $36 trillion. - Worldwide GDP will increase by about $9 trillion. - Global currency imbalances will be eliminated. - All Balance of Payments problems will be eliminated. - Currency crises will be prevented. - Currency speculation will be eliminated. - The need for foreign exchange reserves, with a current annual opportunity cost of approximately $470 billion, will be eliminated. - Worldwide interest rates will be lower than the current average due to the elimination of currency risk. Such gains are realistic and attainable if the world decides to pursue them. The monetary unions of Europe, the Caribbean, Africa and Brunei/Singapore have shown the way. What the people of the world want is sound, stable money and the end to the obsolete multicurrency foreign exchange system. A Single Global Currency is no longer a utopian dream, but a realistic projection of what has been learned from current monetary unions, especially the euro. Each successive annual edition of this book will be priced in the remaining number of currencies until we reach, in the words of Nobel Prize winner, Robert Mundell, that odd number, preferably less than three: one The world needs to set the goal of a Single Global Currency, to be managed by a Global Central Bank, within a Global Monetary Union, and begin planning - now.

Suggested Citation

  • Bonpasse, Morrison, 2009. "The single global currency - common cents for the world (2008 Edition)," MPRA Paper 14756, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:14756

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    single global currency; money; currency; monetary union; currency union; global monetary union; global central bank; global imbalances; current account; balance of payments; transaction charges; transaction costs; foreign exchange derivatives; foreign exchange; foreign exchange reserves; monetary reserves; gold; international monetary fund; SDR; special drawing rights; optimal currency area; OCA; Robert Mundell; John Stuart Mill; dollar; U.S. Dollar; USD; European Monetary Union; euro; European Central Bank; Single Global Currency Association; Bretton Woods; John Maynard Keynes; bancor; DEY; Geo; globo; eartha; dollarization; euroization; exchange rate; exchange rate regime; peg; float; James Tobin; currency crisis; International Monetary Fund; World Bank; Eastern Caribbean Monetary Union; West African Monetary Union; Central African Monetary Union; accession countries; Maastricht criteria; Maastricht Treaty;

    JEL classification:

    • F02 - International Economics - - General - - - International Economic Order and Integration
    • F3 - International Economics - - International Finance
    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • F33 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Monetary Arrangements and Institutions

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