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Energy Consumption, Weather Variability, and Gender in the Philippines: A Discrete/Continuous Approach

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  • Dacuycuy, Connie B.

Abstract

Using a discrete/continuous modeling approach, this paper analyzes energy use and consumption in the Philippines within the context of weather variability and gender. Consistent with energy stacking strategy where households use a combination of traditional and modern energy sources, this paper finds that households use multiple energy sources in different weather fluctuation scenarios. It also finds that weather variability has the highest effects on the electricity consumption of balanced and female-majority households that are female headed and in rural areas. Several policies are suggested.

Suggested Citation

  • Dacuycuy, Connie B., 2017. "Energy Consumption, Weather Variability, and Gender in the Philippines: A Discrete/Continuous Approach," Discussion Papers DP 2017-06, Philippine Institute for Development Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:phd:dpaper:dp_2017-06
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Connie Bayudan-Dacuycuy & Lora Baje, 2017. "Chronic and Transient Poverty and Weather Variability in the Philippines: Evidence Using Components Approach," Working Papers id:12072, eSocialSciences.
    2. Connie Bayudan-Dacuycuy & Lora Baje, 2017. "Chronic Food Poverty in the Philippines," Working Papers id:12071, eSocialSciences.

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    Keywords

    Philippines; discrete/continuous approach; weather variability; gender; energy choice; energy consumption;

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